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Deer Antler Velvet Extract: This moss-like substance has been used in Chinese medicine for years and is thought to contain a number of compounds that can help with tissue regeneration and repair. The antlers are removed safely and without harm to the animal, and the velvet is thought to have applications for improving circulation, strengthening bone density, and improving male libido. There is very little clinical data regarding the effects of deer velvet, and not much is known about its side effects. Some conditions that may potentially be related to deer antler velvet include:
Most of the world's supply of velvet antler comes from Sika deer, red deer and elk or wapiti, including a large deer ranching industry in New Zealand. New Zealand is the world’s largest producer of velvet, producing 450-500 tons of red deer velvet antler annually.[1] China produces 400 tons of predominantly Sika deer velvet antler annually. Russia produces 80 tons annually. United States and Canada each produce 20 tons annually.[2]
Deer Antler Velvet Spray has been tested and results show that this is safe. It doesn’t contain the controversial Human Growth Hormone, but it offers the same benefits. This doesn’t need a prescription. However, the site states that some have experienced mild stomach pains. While this is considered a supplement, doctors still advise you to go in for consultation because this product is surrounded with controversy and isn’t well accepted by the medical community.
Three things I can’t stand: 1. Drama 2. Lying and BS. This story is real and if they let me send pictures showing my side and me now doing pull ups and side intercostal work, which there was no way I could do this before the mail person came, I will darn sure show people that this is REAL! It works! My wife uses the same dose and the Starter I should say actually. Anyways, she was quite chunky but not fat, by American standards. One day she came up to me and showed me her thigh area up towards her private area. It as like her fat was literally melting away and it looked like a skin spider web, if you can even try to imagine that. She lost weight, about 15 lbs. in 8 weeks. We do exercise with a Bowflex and walk 2 miles every other day when the kids do not have loads of confusing homework. We just joined the 90 day Auto Ship Program, so she and I could both have our own bottle for a change. Plus the price is unbeatable. As far as customer service goes here, they take weekends off (get over it, they need time off too), and they ship fast and we are very happy at least.
New Zealand research reports that although the mechanism is unknown, deer antler velvet shows strong anti-inflammatory effects. Recent clinical tests suggest oral ingestion of glycosaminoglycan-peptide complex, or components such as chondroitin sulfate and glucosamine sulfate — both found in deer antler velvet — may help stimulate cartilage repair.

Muscle Builder* - Some "experts" make bold claims that it builds muscle. They compare it to synthetic anabolics that give many athletes who dope an advantage over the competition. This is folly claim that has no backing from direct research or research into other associated fields that would be relevant to deer antler spray. Only one thing will build muscle: proper resistance training. Make the right choice and get to work.*
In the days leading up to Super Bowl XLVII we’ve heard a lot about deer antler velvet and the question of whether or not Baltimore Ravens’ linebacker Ray Lewis used an extract of it (in spray form) to help heal the triceps muscle he tore in October 2012. This could be a problem for Lewis, since deer antler velvet contains a substance that is banned by the National Football League (NFL).

As an international entertainer, it is important for me to keep up with my physical appearance and overall health. Those attributes contribute to longer lasting energy while performing and good stage presence. My physical appearance lacked from being overweight, which in turn effected my energy while performing. I fought with both for many years. This fight caused me to lose out on booking for shows, sponsorships and photo shoots.
Although previously found on the World Anti-Doping Agency's list of banned substances, Deer Antler Spray was removed in 2013 when it was deemed completely safe and legal to consume prior to athletic activity. Deer Antler Spray has been known to speed up the rehabilitation process of injuries, especially injuries effecting cartilage. It has also been known to boost endurance and strength, increase muscle mass, decrease fat, and raise one's testosterone levels, thus increasing libido. The use of Deer Antler Velvet Spray has been linked to several athletes, including football star Ray Lewis, who is rumored to have used it following an injury to his tricep in 2013.
To determine the effects of deer antler velvet on maximal aerobic performance and the trainability of muscular strength and endurance, 38 active males were randomly assigned in a double-blind fashion to either deer antler velvet extract (n = 12), powder (n = 13), or placebo groups (n = 13). Subjects were tested prior to beginning supplementation and a 10-week strength program, and immediately post-training. All subjects were measured for circulating levels of testosterone, insulin-like growth factor, erythropoietin, red cell mass, plasma volume, and total blood volume. Additionally, muscular strength, endurance, and VO2max were determined. All groups improved 6 RM strength equivalently (41 +/- 26%, p < .001), but there was a greater increase in isokinetic knee extensor strength (30 +/- 21% vs. 13 +/- 15%, p = .04) and endurance (21 +/- 19% vs. 7 +/- 12%, p = .02) in the powder compared to placebo group. There were no endocrine, red cell mass or VO2max changes in any group. These findings do not support an erythropoetic or aerobic ergogenic effect of deer antler velvet. Further, the inconsistent findings regarding the effects of deer antler velvet powder supplementation on the development of strength suggests that further work is required to test the robustness of the observation that this supplement enhances the strength training response and to ensure this observation is not a type I error.
Velvet antler in the form of deer antler spray has been at the center of multiple controversies with professional sports leagues and famous athletes allegedly using it for injury recovery and performance enhancement purposes.[18] In mid-2011 a National Football League (NFL) player successfully sued a deer antler velvet spray manufacturer for testing positive for methyltestosterone in 2009 for a total amount of 5.4 million US dollars.[19][20] In August 2011, Major League Baseball (MLB) added deer antler spray to their list of prohibited items because it contains "potentially contaminated nutritional supplements." [21]
In an ovalbumin sensitized mouse model, 4 weeks of Velvet Antler at 2.5-10mg total (weight of mice not given, assuming 20g this equals 125-500mg/kg or 10-40mg/kg for humans) was able to reduce total Immunoglobulin E (IgE) and Ovalbumin-specific IgE at 14, 21, and 28 days.[21] When challenged with methacholine and subsequently having their airway power measured, it appeared that Velvet Antler exert anti-asthmatic effects in regards to allergies.[21] 
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