Currently, IGF-1 is banned by both the World Anti-Doping Agency and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). However, deer antler spray seems to provide only very small amounts of IGF-1. This is why it’s no longer considered illegal. Insulin-like growth factor is also naturally found in other animal-derived foods, including eggs, milk and red meat. Some experts believe that the amount of IGF-1 obtained from using deer antler products is really not much more than from eating these foods.
Have you been searching for a supplement that can help you raise your workouts and physical performance to the next level? Maybe you've considered using Deer Antler Velvet before but aren't really sure what it is or which supplement is right for you? Look no further - our Deer Antler Spray is made with only the highest quality and nutrient-rich velvet directly from Red Deer in New Zealand.
The company has found that powders have only about a 15–20 percent absorption rate of IGF-1. This is due to how the digestive system breaks down the powder. Nutronics states that their “proprietary sublingual spray delivery system” is superior to many competitors because it offers “enhanced bioavailability” of IGF-1. They also point out that “it is not the milligrams of Deer Antler Velvet in the product, it’s the content of IGF-1 and other Growth Factors in Deer Antler Velvet, that makes the difference.”(6)
In Asia, velvet antler is dried and sold as slices, or as a powder which may be boiled in water, usually with other herbs and ingredients, and consumed as a medicinal soup.[6] In the traditional commercial trade of Korea and China, whole stick antler velvet is divided into three sections based upon their supposed properties. Although there is an absence of uniform standardization, these sections are known as the wax piece (uppers or tips), the blood piece (middles), and the bone piece (bottoms): the wax piece may be marketed as a growth tonic for children, the blood piece supposedly for joint and bone health, and the bone piece supposedly for calcium deficiency and geriatric needs.[2][5][9] Early commercial activity in Russia between the 1930s and 1980s led to the production of an alcohol extract from deer antler velvet marketed under the Russian drug trade name Pantocrin (also pantocrine or pantokrin).[10][11]

Deer antler velvet can play a pivotal role in helping to not only relieve the symptoms of diseases that affect joints, such as osteoarthritis, they can possibly eliminate them entirely. The way it may do this is through the introduction of chondroitin sulfate and glucosamine sulfate into the body. Both of these compounds are abundant in deer antler velvet.
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