My knee also started to hurt as well as I was acquiring plantar fasciitis and I couldn’t figure out how to keep myself from hurting until a co-worker told me about Velvet Deer Antler from the sports news. He showed me your site and as a pure skeptic, ordered my 10,000ng of IGF-1. After the FIRST WEEK, I noticed that my plantar fasciitis had practically gone away WITHOUT wearing night splints, my knee had stopped inflaming, and no longer needed a full on brace (as seen in the picture).
Since I’ve been taking your IGF-1 product, I’ve been able to shadow box up to 30 minutes a day. Your product has helped me tremendously even at my age. I haven’t felt this good in years. My energy, stamina and mobility are back. I wish I had this product back in the day. I would recommend the IGF-1 100,000 Maximum to anyone, whether they are an athlete or not. IGF-1 is unbelievable! It is a real championship product. Hope to see you soon.

Its got a bunch of stuff in it, don't miss that link above about the constituents. But, overall it contains a large amount of peptides and minerals that work synergistically with unique compounds such as hyaluronic acid and growth factors to elicit many of the effects and results. Firstly we will outline the most scientifically backed uses of deer antler velvet. Read on and make your own conclusions from the evidence supplied in the rest of this article.

The word antler is derived from the Latin Anteoculae, meaning "in front of the eyes." Antlers are present in almost all members of the deer family Cervidae. The first documented evidence of deer velvet as a medicinal was found on a scroll recovered from a tomb in Hunan China dating back 2000 years. The use of antler dates back to the Han Dynasty 206 BC to 220 AD. A 16th century medical text, Pen Ts'ao Kang Mu, lists several antler preparations including pills, tinctures, and ointments. In traditional Chinese medicine, velvet antler has been used for over 2000 years as a tonic, to improve bone health, to nourish the blood, reduce swelling, and to treat impotence. Later research on deer antler dates back to the 1980s in Russia. Hundreds of articles have since been published including those documented by Chinese, Korean, and Japanese scientists.14, 15
A systemic review on human interventions[25] makes note of a study conducted on patients of osteoarthritis (Edelman et al. 2000; cannot be located online) which found improvements in joint pain symptoms relative to baseline in the Velvet Antler group and not placebo, although a lack of information on blinding and randomization precludes results that can be drawn from this study.
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