In a double blind study (Edelman, 2000), 54 patients with arthritis in the knee were given deer antler velvet or a placebo and assessed at 1, 3 and 6 months. Patients treated with deer antler velvet showed improvement in pain and physical global assessment at 3 and 6 months. No significant improvement was observed for the placebo group for any of the parameters examined.
In a randomized, placebo controlled test in 2004, researchers at the University of Alberta, Canada, placed 18 males from the Edmonton Police Force into a 9 week strength training program. The results showed that deer antler velvet increased the strength and endurance of the subjects relative to the control group. The researchers found that use of deer antler velvet significantly increased blood plasma testosterone levels. 
Deer antler velvet has made its way into the spotlight recently thanks to claims that Super Bowl winner Ray Lewis used it in spray form to recover from his October triceps injury. Lewis denied the claim, but had many people wondering if deer antler velvet, a substance that is banned by the NFL and claims to increase strength and boost muscle recovery, really works. The natural supplement, made from the fuzz that covers male deer antlers, is a growth hormone known as IGF-1, which supposedly can repair cartilege damage and increase strength and muscle mass. 
Performance - Borrowing the scientific research, its mandatory use by the Soviets has shown increased blood circulatory benefits, liver protective attributes and nerve strengthening effects of the aqueous alcohol extract.* This means it increases nervous innervation, easily known as the contractile capacity of muscle groups.* This leads to short burst style athletic performance increases found in weightlifting, bodybuilding, and similar sports.*
On to the Deer Antler Spray and it’s positive effects this has had on my wife and I. Starting with me: In 2005 I had a titanium cage put into my L4-L5 lumbar region. My left leg was always numb and slept very little until a great neurosurgeon repaired it. Then 1 day I was on my 2 mile walk, and all of a sudden I felt this horrible left side pain. By that night my son, who was 16 at the time, said that my left side was all swelled up. It was hell all over again for me. I went to many doctors, stopped many in the halls of the University of Iowa Hospitals and asked if they could give me a tell. Of course none of them knew either. I was on hydrocodone for 4 years and also put on Lyrica. After hearing about Ray Lewis making this remarkable comeback from his tricep injury, which was really damaged and at his age should have retired, he came back for the playoffs. This blew me away because I also know much about sports injuries being I am an ex-athlete. 

New Zealand research reports that although the mechanism is unknown, deer antler velvet shows strong anti-inflammatory effects. Recent clinical tests suggest oral ingestion of glycosaminoglycan-peptide complex, or components such as chondroitin sulfate and glucosamine sulfate — both found in deer antler velvet — may help stimulate cartilage repair.
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In Asia, velvet antler is dried and sold as slices, or as a powder which may be boiled in water, usually with other herbs and ingredients, and consumed as a medicinal soup.[6] In the traditional commercial trade of Korea and China, whole stick antler velvet is divided into three sections based upon their supposed properties. Although there is an absence of uniform standardization, these sections are known as the wax piece (uppers or tips), the blood piece (middles), and the bone piece (bottoms): the wax piece may be marketed as a growth tonic for children, the blood piece supposedly for joint and bone health, and the bone piece supposedly for calcium deficiency and geriatric needs.[2][5][9] Early commercial activity in Russia between the 1930s and 1980s led to the production of an alcohol extract from deer antler velvet marketed under the Russian drug trade name Pantocrin (also pantocrine or pantokrin).[10][11]
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