The word antler is derived from the Latin Anteoculae, meaning "in front of the eyes." Antlers are present in almost all members of the deer family Cervidae. The first documented evidence of deer velvet as a medicinal was found on a scroll recovered from a tomb in Hunan China dating back 2000 years. The use of antler dates back to the Han Dynasty 206 BC to 220 AD. A 16th century medical text, Pen Ts'ao Kang Mu, lists several antler preparations including pills, tinctures, and ointments. In traditional Chinese medicine, velvet antler has been used for over 2000 years as a tonic, to improve bone health, to nourish the blood, reduce swelling, and to treat impotence. Later research on deer antler dates back to the 1980s in Russia. Hundreds of articles have since been published including those documented by Chinese, Korean, and Japanese scientists.14, 15
The movie The Raging Bull was inspired by the true life story of boxing legend and middle weight champion of the world, Jake Lamotta. He was known as the Raging Bull and the Bronx Bull. His character was depicted by Academy award winner Robert Deniro and went on to win 2 oscars under the direction of Martin Scorsese. Jake Lamotta was known as one of the toughest fighters in the world. He fought Sugar Ray Robinson 6 times in his career, the last fight being remembered as the Saint Valentine’s Day Massacre.
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Being a former collegiate athlete, I’m no stranger to working out. When a former teammate of mine started talking about this new, state of the art, health product and the effects he was getting from it, it peaked my interest needless to say. I remember him continually saying that I’d have to try it to believe what it does for you. Wow, I must now say that I know what he means (and then some)! First of all, this IGF-1 Plus™ Formula did have some impressive results for me in my workouts. It’s not only helped my strength, but it seems that I especially notice a difference in my joints and my recovery time. Since I lift with heavy weights, my joints used to ache after working out, but they no longer do! My endurance also has really improved as well. I’ve actually doubled the time and distance that I was doing before (and I’ve only been on it for a little over a month)! An unexpected (but much welcomed) improvement that has been incredible is in how clearly I’ve been able to think and I feel very little stress anymore. It almost like someone put a micro-computer chip in my brain that makes it work much more efficiently without trying nearly as hard. It’s one of those things that you have to try to really believe it (trust me, it has done much more than I expected it to). I look forward to turning a friend of mine on to it, since he’s a personal trainer and trains professional athletes! Thanks, Dr. Duarte. I plan to use your IGF-1 Plus™ from now on, and will stock up so I don’t run out!
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Deer Antler Velvet Spray has been tested and results show that this is safe. It doesn’t contain the controversial Human Growth Hormone, but it offers the same benefits. This doesn’t need a prescription. However, the site states that some have experienced mild stomach pains. While this is considered a supplement, doctors still advise you to go in for consultation because this product is surrounded with controversy and isn’t well accepted by the medical community.

Cassie Bell is an editor, blogger, writer, and teacher, and obtained a Bachelor of Science in Education from the University of Central Arkansas. Previously, she was a soldier in the Army for eight years as a Dental Assistant and currently work full-time as an English teacher. She believes children are the future, and my goal is to make them life-learners. She builds a positive rapport with students, parents, and the community. She believes in continuing to higher your education and professional development to enhance content and pedagogical skill as well as technology. She is a mother of two with her husband in Arkansas. You can connect with her on Linkedin.


The growing market has bred plenty of competition. A company called Now Foods is now making deer antler velvet lozenges. GNC just started selling deer antler velvet capsules called New Vigor from a company called Vitalast and Amazon.com has more than 30 products will deer antler velvet in it including the raw powder from New Zealand, where the most coveted deer velvet is harvested.
Deer antler velvet has made its way into the spotlight recently thanks to claims that Super Bowl winner Ray Lewis used it in spray form to recover from his October triceps injury. Lewis denied the claim, but had many people wondering if deer antler velvet, a substance that is banned by the NFL and claims to increase strength and boost muscle recovery, really works. The natural supplement, made from the fuzz that covers male deer antlers, is a growth hormone known as IGF-1, which supposedly can repair cartilege damage and increase strength and muscle mass. 
Joint Health & Injury Recovery* - Due to certain constituents recognized by the government one will benefit by better joint health, plus the content of proteins similar to our own bodily structures are plentiful within deer antler supplements, such as type II collagen.* Another involved and interesting cellular activator known as hyaluronic acid has many additional benefits for repair and regeneration.
At Nutronics Labs, we let our products’ results speak for themselves. Our customers continue to come back month-after-month because they get real results with IGF-1 Plus. Thats why we offer a 30 day, 100% money back guarantee** on all of our retail priced products with no strings attached. If you aren’t satisfied with our products for any reason, we will give you a full refund, no questions asked.

(Adult) Shake well before use. As a dietary supplement, take 6 sprays under tongue once per day. Hold for 20 seconds before swallowing for best results. Caution: Do not use if outer seal is broken. Not intended for individuals under the age of 18. Consult your health care provider prior to use if you are pregnant or nursing, have a medical condition, or when taking any medication. * CONTAINS: SOY. * This statement has not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. Contains 25,000 NG. of IGF-1, IGF-2 and other Growth Factors

In Asia, velvet antler is dried and sold as slices, or as a powder which may be boiled in water, usually with other herbs and ingredients, and consumed as a medicinal soup.[6] In the traditional commercial trade of Korea and China, whole stick antler velvet is divided into three sections based upon their supposed properties. Although there is an absence of uniform standardization, these sections are known as the wax piece (uppers or tips), the blood piece (middles), and the bone piece (bottoms): the wax piece may be marketed as a growth tonic for children, the blood piece supposedly for joint and bone health, and the bone piece supposedly for calcium deficiency and geriatric needs.[2][5][9] Early commercial activity in Russia between the 1930s and 1980s led to the production of an alcohol extract from deer antler velvet marketed under the Russian drug trade name Pantocrin (also pantocrine or pantokrin).[10][11]
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