If you have any existing medical condition that requires taking medication, always consult your physician before taking any new products. Discuss if deer antler spray will be safe for you to use if you have a history of serious hormonal problems, heart disease, liver or kidney disease, or any other serious condition. It’s also not wise to stop taking any medications you’ve been taking or to end physical therapy sessions/exercises because you’ve started taking deer antler spray. Always follow up with your doctor or therapist if you have questions about changing your recovery plan regarding an injury or illness.
According to modern research, deer antler velvet has shown gonadotropic activity. Studies by both Fisher and Wang indicate that deer antler velvet may increase testosterone levels in men and can help prevent some conditions associated with aging. The estrogen hormone most affected by deer antler velvet is estradiol. Estradiol is a precursor to testosterone.

And is easily understood as increasing the state of health, well-being and performance of body, mind and spirit. We see that its been known by many names. More recently in the Western world, a liquid form, sometimes known as deer antler spray, has become popular within North American for its specific cellular and glandular benefits. But what's all this buzz and hype?


In what might be the most important study done in the United States, a group of scientists took 32 male weight lifters and gave half of them New Zealand Deer Antler Velvet and half of them a placebo for 10 weeks. While the placebo group didn't show any difference in bench or squat tests, those given deer antler velvet saw an increase of 4 percent on the bench press and 10.1 percent on the squat test as compared to the placebo group. The scientists also reported that there was a "significant improvement in aerobic capacity" with the group that was taking deer antler velvet.
Insulin-like Growth Factor 1 (IGF-1) is an anabolic molecule which appears to induce growth of the antlers themselves,[31][32] although testosterone may be the primary growth factor.[33] Currently, there is no evidence that serum IGF-1 is increased following Velvet Antler ingestion with one study using 1.5g of Velvet Antler for 11 weeks failing to increase serum IGF-1.[26]
A systemic review on human interventions[25] makes note of a study conducted on patients of osteoarthritis (Edelman et al. 2000; cannot be located online) which found improvements in joint pain symptoms relative to baseline in the Velvet Antler group and not placebo, although a lack of information on blinding and randomization precludes results that can be drawn from this study.
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