Tribulus: An extract taken from the Mediterranean puncture vine that some cultures believe to have medicinal values. There is little clinical data surrounding the bio-physical effects of tribulus, however some people take it to enhance athletic performance, sexual ability, and improve circulation. Not much is known about the long-term consequences of tribulus consumption, however there are some indications that it may potentially lead to prostate issues in some men.
Deer antler spray — a supplement commonly used in the fitness and sports industries that has a long history of use in Eastern medicine — is pretty much as strange as it sounds. Derived from the tissue found inside deer antlers, it’s reported to work by providing IGF-1 (insulin-like growth factor), a natural growth hormone found inside the human body that has potential to increase muscle mass and support recovery from injuries.

This information relates to an herbal, vitamin, mineral or other dietary supplement. This product has not been reviewed by the FDA to determine whether it is safe or effective and is not subject to the quality standards and safety information collection standards that are applicable to most prescription drugs. This information should not be used to decide whether or not to take this product. This information does not endorse this product as safe, effective, or approved for treating any patient or health condition. This is only a brief summary of general information about this product. It does NOT include all information about the possible uses, directions, warnings, precautions, interactions, adverse effects, or risks that may apply to this product. This information is not specific medical advice and does not replace information you receive from your health care provider. You should talk with your health care provider for complete information about the risks and benefits of using this product.
In an experiment (Gerard, 2004) conducted to study muscle damage and repair, 20 males ran for 35 minutes on a downhill treadmill. The participants, who were not trained runners, were pre-treated with deer antler velvet or a placebo 14 days prior to the run. The subjected treated with deer velvet showed that their creatine kinase levels, a marker of muscle damage, was significantly lower than the control group. Also, muscle soreness on average was reported to be gone 24 hours before subjects in control.
Ultimately it is too early in the testing process for our experts to be able to recommend Deer Antler Velvet Spray as either safe or effective as a joint health supplement. It is more possible it is effective as a male libido enhancer than as a nutritional supplement, and there is little reason to think that Deer Antler Velvet Spray could do much to actually contribute to the health of the body’s connective tissues. It does not have any anti-inflammatory agents to fight joint pain, there is only the smallest amount of glucosamine and chondroitin, and finally the potential for negative consequences is too high for our team to be able to encourage our readers to consume this product.
As you know I’ve been a Hollywood stuntman and director for over 30 years and during my stunt man career I have accumulated many injuries along with aches, pains and arthritis. Since I’ve been taking your IGF-1 product, my arthritis is 100% better and I’ve forgotten about my injuries. This product is truly amazing and has worked wonders for me. I also appreciate the sleep miracle as it helps me get a good nights sleep and feel great in the morning.
Deer antler velvet can play a pivotal role in helping to not only relieve the symptoms of diseases that affect joints, such as osteoarthritis, they can possibly eliminate them entirely. The way it may do this is through the introduction of chondroitin sulfate and glucosamine sulfate into the body. Both of these compounds are abundant in deer antler velvet.
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