IGF-1 can help slow this aging process down by increasing the telomere length of our DNA. Telomeres are a protective "cap" at the end of each strand of our DNA which prevents the DNA from becoming damaged. DNA becomes damaged as the telomeres grow shorter with age. As more DNA strands become damaged, cells in our bodies can no longer function properly which results in many medical conditions, diseases, and even death. This is how IGF-1 can help longevity. It does this by promoting healthy DNA strands to keep our cellular functions optimal.
The answer is that deer antler velvet is just another fat burner. Another cell volumizer. Another body-toning shoe. It’s fitness marketing at it’s finest—playing off a goal you desire (gaining more muscle and size) and drawing unsubstantiated and wildly exaggerated claims. There’s nothing miraculous about deer antler spray. And after a closer look at the product, there’s really—well—nothing to it at all.

Most of the world's supply of velvet antler comes from Sika deer, red deer and elk or wapiti, including a large deer ranching industry in New Zealand. New Zealand is the world’s largest producer of velvet, producing 450-500 tons of red deer velvet antler annually.[1] China produces 400 tons of predominantly Sika deer velvet antler annually. Russia produces 80 tons annually. United States and Canada each produce 20 tons annually.[2]
A systemic review on human interventions[25] makes note of a study conducted on patients of osteoarthritis (Edelman et al. 2000; cannot be located online) which found improvements in joint pain symptoms relative to baseline in the Velvet Antler group and not placebo, although a lack of information on blinding and randomization precludes results that can be drawn from this study. 
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