There must be a reason to is use and a booming world industry that garners the attention of several researchers and scientist in many countries. Modern understanding has greatly advanced our knowledge of velvet antler. We know by its composition and the knowledge of the structure and function of the plenitude of constituents which work together, like a symphony, to create an efficacious supplement that yields a multitude of benefits.

After about 55-60 days of growth the velvet antler is removed painlessly from the deer in less than 60 seconds so that it may be done as humanely as possible. These deer are not harmed and experience no pain in the removal of their velvet antlers for our consumption. The antler is then scraped of its fuzzy velvet and then cleaned before it is sanitized and pasteurized for safety, and then inspected for quality grading.


The IGF-1 in deer antler velvet can help increase the body's natural healing by affecting cell repair and growth. When an injury or surgery occurs that leaves a wound on the body, the wound is healed naturally by the cells which line the wound. Those cells multiply and rejoin over time. Using deer antler velvet can help promote faster cell repair and growth so that the wound can heal at a faster rate which means less time being injured or sore.

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This information relates to an herbal, vitamin, mineral or other dietary supplement. This product has not been reviewed by the FDA to determine whether it is safe or effective and is not subject to the quality standards and safety information collection standards that are applicable to most prescription drugs. This information should not be used to decide whether or not to take this product. This information does not endorse this product as safe, effective, or approved for treating any patient or health condition. This is only a brief summary of general information about this product. It does NOT include all information about the possible uses, directions, warnings, precautions, interactions, adverse effects, or risks that may apply to this product. This information is not specific medical advice and does not replace information you receive from your health care provider. You should talk with your health care provider for complete information about the risks and benefits of using this product.

Bottom line: Rogol says it’s “extremely unlikely” that deer antler in any form could offer athletes a boost. “Deer antlers do contain growth factors,” he explains. But it’s a huge leap of faith to talk about an extract doing anything beneficial for human beings, whether it’s slowing aging, developing muscle, or repairing tendons, he adds. Opinions like Rogol’s are one reason the FDA and anti-doping agencies haven’t yet taken steps to ban deer antler products that contain IGF-1.


Tissue Growth* - Ancient use was as a growth tonic for underdeveloping children and as a gland activator for the glandularly deficient.* It was also recommended to maturing people because of this interesting action on the body.* In modern times it has been discovered that very small amounts of key constituents, called growth factors, signal cellular structures for regeneration and growth, and are found in deer antler velvet extract itself and in larger amounts within the circulating blood of those who take it.*
In Asia, velvet antler is dried and sold as slices, or as a powder which may be boiled in water, usually with other herbs and ingredients, and consumed as a medicinal soup.[6] In the traditional commercial trade of Korea and China, whole stick antler velvet is divided into three sections based upon their supposed properties. Although there is an absence of uniform standardization, these sections are known as the wax piece (uppers or tips), the blood piece (middles), and the bone piece (bottoms): the wax piece may be marketed as a growth tonic for children, the blood piece supposedly for joint and bone health, and the bone piece supposedly for calcium deficiency and geriatric needs.[2][5][9] Early commercial activity in Russia between the 1930s and 1980s led to the production of an alcohol extract from deer antler velvet marketed under the Russian drug trade name Pantocrin (also pantocrine or pantokrin).[10][11]
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