Yes, the Soviets had even been involved in extensive research to ascertain the performance benefits of deer antler velvet. But they've been using it for awhile. In their country it was known in Russian folk use to be a warming and vitalizing food several hundred years ago, but with the advent of modern history, they began research nearly 90 years ago.
Many people from many cultures use it. Throughout history it has been used by the American Indians, Europeans, Romans, Russians, and Asians as an alcohol extract. Often it was easily made into soups for its strengthening bone broth protein full of raw material for tissues, joints and bone. The most complete ancient literature is the Chinese texts, which give it top classification for over 2,000 years.
Tonic Adaptogen* - This is a fancy concept that references the research into supplements that elicit a strengthening effect on the body and its systems.* They are tonic in action and stimulate clean holistic energy and prevent fatigue while helping us to overcome stress and maintain strong immune systems.* Due to some of the following actions we will see that this stress adaptation is generally physical in nature.

(Adult) Shake well before each use. As a dietary supplement, spray 3 to 5 times under tongue as needed. Hold for 20 seconds before swallowing for best results. Caution: Do not use if outer seal is broken. Not intended for individuals under the age of 18. Consult your health care provider prior to use if you are pregnant or nursing, have a medical condition, or when taking any medication. *Contains Soy
Currently, IGF-1 is banned by both the World Anti-Doping Agency and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). However, deer antler spray seems to provide only very small amounts of IGF-1. This is why it’s no longer considered illegal. Insulin-like growth factor is also naturally found in other animal-derived foods, including eggs, milk and red meat. Some experts believe that the amount of IGF-1 obtained from using deer antler products is really not much more than from eating these foods.

"I am 60 years old and had polio when I was six months old. Throughout my childhood I had 7 orthopedic surgeries to correct the damage leftover by polio to my left hip, leg and foot. I am battle scarred and a Post Polio Syndrome Survivor. I cannot praise your product enough! Its difficult for me to walk. I normally use a battery powered scooter in malls and airports. The least amount of physical exertion walking and standing creates days of agony afterwards. This past Saturday I walked the mall, went for a movie and dinner. I was active all day and well into the night without tiring. I kept waiting for the intense painful spasms and muscle contractions from my polio atrophied muscles in the left leg and also my hips. Usually late at night is when the pain and spasms are the most intense. But guess what? I am not hurting anywhere near the level I use too. I am not fatigued. I used Antler Farm's Deer Antler Velvet a couple of years ago when traveling to Machu Picchu, Peru. I am still amazed I climbed the ancient Inca Trail unaided with just my cane. Antler Farm's Deer Antler Velvet has improved my quality of life significantly."*
All male members of the deer family, including elk, moose and reindeer (caribou), grow a new set of antlers each year’from scratch, in just a matter of months’then shed them at the end of the annual mating season. The ability to regenerate such large appendages each year is unique to this family among mammals and rare in the animal kingdom as a whole (horns, in contrast to antlers, are permanent and cannot be regrown). Understanding how it happens could have significant implications for human medicine, particularly in the fields of wound healing and organ regeneration.
Deer antler velvet can play a pivotal role in helping to not only relieve the symptoms of diseases that affect joints, such as osteoarthritis, they can possibly eliminate them entirely. The way it may do this is through the introduction of chondroitin sulfate and glucosamine sulfate into the body. Both of these compounds are abundant in deer antler velvet.
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