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According to an article in Sports Illustrated, Lewis spoke by telephone after his injury with Mitch Ross, co-owner of the supplement company S.W.A.T.S. (Sports with Alternatives to Steroids) to ask about treatments that could speed his recovery. Sports Illustrated reported that among Ross’ recommendations were deer antler pills to “rebuild your brain via your small intestines.” In addition to recommending the pills, Ross reportedly also told Lewis to spray deer antler extract under his tongue. Lewis has denied following this advice, and Ravens’ management has said that the star player has never flunked a drug test.

Euricoma Longfolia: A shrub found in Southeast Asia that is said by some native cultures to enhance male virility. It has been used unofficially to treat fever, high blood pressure, bone pain, and syphilis, and the limited clinical data about euricoma longfolia that exists suggests it may possibly increase testosterone levels. There is no data about the long-term effects of euricoma longfolia consumption.

Deer Antler Velvet Spray is an extract that’s taken directly from the material that grows on the outside of the antlers of deer, elk, moose and caribou. Their website suggests its use for anyone that is looking to counter the effects of light exercise, mild muscular strain and exertion, and some arthritic conditions. In addition to providing joint support, Deer Antler Velvet Spray is said to balance hormone levels, build muscle, boost sexual performance, and improve immune function.
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Sourced from New Zealand, Piping Rock’s IGF-1+ extra strength Deer Antler Velvet Spray taps into ancient practices famously exploring male virility.** Each spray contains the beneficial amino acids, peptides, proteins and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1+) naturally found in deer velvet, making this spray a popular choice among athletes, fitness enthusiasts and those who are looking to support muscle strength, stamina, vitality and overall male performance.**
Research in Korea, New Zealand and China has shown that deer antler velvet can stimulate the immune system. Extracts of deer antler velvet were variously shown to increase macrophage activity, stimulate the production of lymphocytes and increase the number of red and white blood cells. Each of these effects may directly complement the body’s ability to resist or fight disease and so promote and maintain health and an associated feeling of well being.
Velvet antler has been used in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) that classifies many similar substances from a variety of species under the simplified Chinese name 鹿茸; (pinyin Lu Rong) and the commercial name Cervi Cornu Pantorichum.[citation needed] The two common species used within the TCM system are sika deer and red deer which are thought to be useful for treating yang deficiency syndromes.[6][7][8]

Reports claim deer antler helped Ray Lewis overcome his recent triceps tear, and Vijay Singh has admitted to using a spray supplement. University of Alabama football players also allegedly used deer antler sprays leading up to the 2013 BCS National Title Game. Whether or not those reports are true, one thing is certain: There’s not much proof that deer antler is a performance enhancer or a miraculous healer.
Cassie Bell is an editor, blogger, writer, and teacher, and obtained a Bachelor of Science in Education from the University of Central Arkansas. Previously, she was a soldier in the Army for eight years as a Dental Assistant and currently work full-time as an English teacher. She believes children are the future, and my goal is to make them life-learners. She builds a positive rapport with students, parents, and the community. She believes in continuing to higher your education and professional development to enhance content and pedagogical skill as well as technology. She is a mother of two with her husband in Arkansas. You can connect with her on Linkedin.
For those of you in your teens and 20’s, if you take this type of supplementation your body will begin to stop producing this naturally; and that right there is NOT a good thing. If you really believe you are getting some benefit from using this supplement than you will need to take more and more as your body stops making it completely (at an early age), and will most very likely have complications later, if not sooner, due to having to increase your dose. Therefore when it is found, and it is known that IGF-1, the active ingredient of why Deer Antler Velvet is used, can cause cancer, especially prostate cancer and the enlargement of other vital organs in the body, not muscles.
To determine the effects of deer antler velvet on maximal aerobic performance and the trainability of muscular strength and endurance, 38 active males were randomly assigned in a double-blind fashion to either deer antler velvet extract (n = 12), powder (n = 13), or placebo groups (n = 13). Subjects were tested prior to beginning supplementation and a 10-week strength program, and immediately post-training. All subjects were measured for circulating levels of testosterone, insulin-like growth factor, erythropoietin, red cell mass, plasma volume, and total blood volume. Additionally, muscular strength, endurance, and VO2max were determined. All groups improved 6 RM strength equivalently (41 +/- 26%, p < .001), but there was a greater increase in isokinetic knee extensor strength (30 +/- 21% vs. 13 +/- 15%, p = .04) and endurance (21 +/- 19% vs. 7 +/- 12%, p = .02) in the powder compared to placebo group. There were no endocrine, red cell mass or VO2max changes in any group. These findings do not support an erythropoetic or aerobic ergogenic effect of deer antler velvet. Further, the inconsistent findings regarding the effects of deer antler velvet powder supplementation on the development of strength suggests that further work is required to test the robustness of the observation that this supplement enhances the strength training response and to ensure this observation is not a type I error.

The latest and greatest performance enhancer, if you've been living under a rock, is deer antler velvet. On the surface, it seems like it could make sense. The coating on the antlers of young male deer that contribute to the growth of that part of their body could help athletes. First, the NFL prohibited Oakland Raiders coach Hue Jackson from endorsing it. Now, according to SI.com, Major League Baseball is warning players about using it.
A systemic review on human interventions[25] makes note of a study conducted on patients of osteoarthritis (Edelman et al. 2000; cannot be located online) which found improvements in joint pain symptoms relative to baseline in the Velvet Antler group and not placebo, although a lack of information on blinding and randomization precludes results that can be drawn from this study.
Chondroitin sulfate is a compound of connective tissues that are usually found in cartilage. Glucosamine sulfate is a natural building block for the growth and maintenance of healthy cartilage. Since osteoarthritis is caused by the deterioration of the cartilage in the bone joints, a daily supplement of deer antler velvet can help to stimulate the repair of deteriorated bone cartilage with healthy doses of chondroitin sulfate and glucosamine sulfate.
Insulin-like Growth Factor 1 (IGF-1) is an anabolic molecule which appears to induce growth of the antlers themselves,[31][32] although testosterone may be the primary growth factor.[33] Currently, there is no evidence that serum IGF-1 is increased following Velvet Antler ingestion with one study using 1.5g of Velvet Antler for 11 weeks failing to increase serum IGF-1.[26]
On to the Deer Antler Spray and it’s positive effects this has had on my wife and I. Starting with me: In 2005 I had a titanium cage put into my L4-L5 lumbar region. My left leg was always numb and slept very little until a great neurosurgeon repaired it. Then 1 day I was on my 2 mile walk, and all of a sudden I felt this horrible left side pain. By that night my son, who was 16 at the time, said that my left side was all swelled up. It was hell all over again for me. I went to many doctors, stopped many in the halls of the University of Iowa Hospitals and asked if they could give me a tell. Of course none of them knew either. I was on hydrocodone for 4 years and also put on Lyrica. After hearing about Ray Lewis making this remarkable comeback from his tricep injury, which was really damaged and at his age should have retired, he came back for the playoffs. This blew me away because I also know much about sports injuries being I am an ex-athlete.
The word antler is derived from the Latin Anteoculae, meaning "in front of the eyes." Antlers are present in almost all members of the deer family Cervidae. The first documented evidence of deer velvet as a medicinal was found on a scroll recovered from a tomb in Hunan China dating back 2000 years. The use of antler dates back to the Han Dynasty 206 BC to 220 AD. A 16th century medical text, Pen Ts'ao Kang Mu, lists several antler preparations including pills, tinctures, and ointments. In traditional Chinese medicine, velvet antler has been used for over 2000 years as a tonic, to improve bone health, to nourish the blood, reduce swelling, and to treat impotence. Later research on deer antler dates back to the 1980s in Russia. Hundreds of articles have since been published including those documented by Chinese, Korean, and Japanese scientists.14, 15
The growing market has bred plenty of competition. A company called Now Foods is now making deer antler velvet lozenges. GNC just started selling deer antler velvet capsules called New Vigor from a company called Vitalast and Amazon.com has more than 30 products will deer antler velvet in it including the raw powder from New Zealand, where the most coveted deer velvet is harvested.
It is difficult to analyze the quality of Deer Antler Velvet Spray’s ingredients due to their largely untested nature. Deer velvet contains glucosamine and chondroitin, two key chemicals in the body’s joint health processes that our panel of experts highly recommends. It may also increase estrogen production in the body, which can be both good and bad. In some that may be helpful for correcting existing hormonal imbalances, for others it may create them.
Deer antler velvet has made its way into the spotlight recently thanks to claims that Super Bowl winner Ray Lewis used it in spray form to recover from his October triceps injury. Lewis denied the claim, but had many people wondering if deer antler velvet, a substance that is banned by the NFL and claims to increase strength and boost muscle recovery, really works. The natural supplement, made from the fuzz that covers male deer antlers, is a growth hormone known as IGF-1, which supposedly can repair cartilege damage and increase strength and muscle mass. 
In 168 persons with stable Rheumatoid Arthritis but present pain (25-100mm on the VAS rating scale) given either 1g of Velvet Antler from Elk or placebo for 6 months noted that there were no significant differences between placebo and Velvet Antler in regards to pain.[23] Another study by the same research group using a smaller sample (n=40) and graded doses of 430mg, 860mg, and 1290mg daily noted that there was a dose-dependent trend towards reduced pain symptoms but this was not statistically significant.[24]
According to an article published by Business Insider, between 20 to 40 percent of professional MLB and NFL athletes admit to purchasing and using deer antler spray (also called “deer antler velvet”). They hope to benefit from its performing-enhancing effects. (1) Some famous athletes turn to deer antler spray in hopes of promoting growth of new tissue cells or gaining strength due to more easily putting on lean muscle mass.
A growing trend in western medicine is the proliferation of influences from ancient eastern medicine. Over 2,000 years ago, the Chinese were administering deer antler velvet to treat conditions ranging from serious illnesses to lack of sexual desire. After closely examining the wide range of health benefits deer antler velvet promotes, it's no wonder why the Chinese used it as a medicine for thousands of years.
Other uses include treatment of high cholesterol, high blood pressure, migraines, muscle aches and pains, asthma, indigestion, weak bones (osteoporosis), headache, liver and kidney disorders, cold hands and feet, soreness and weakness in the lower back and knees, chronic skin ulcers, and overactive bladder. It is also used to promote youthfulness, sharpen thinking skills, protect the liver from toxins, stimulate production and circulation of blood, and increase the number of red blood cells.
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