I would like to express my deepest gratitude for IGF-1. I am 54 years old and until now I have suffered with chronic fatigue, depression and insomnia. After being on IGF-1 for less than 1 month, my energy levels are back up and improving more everyday. I once took 3 naps per day just to function, I do not need naps anymore. I once needed prescription sleeps aids, now I sleep all night long without medication, thanks to IGF-1. It is hard to put into words all that IGF-1 is doing for me, so I will just say I feel like a new man with vitality that I have not felt in 25 years.

Tissue Growth* - Ancient use was as a growth tonic for underdeveloping children and as a gland activator for the glandularly deficient.* It was also recommended to maturing people because of this interesting action on the body.* In modern times it has been discovered that very small amounts of key constituents, called growth factors, signal cellular structures for regeneration and growth, and are found in deer antler velvet extract itself and in larger amounts within the circulating blood of those who take it.*
Arthritis Relief: Arthritis is simply the inflammation of a joint. That inflammation is what causes pain of the joint. Reduce inflammation and you reduce pain. That’s why aspirin is so good for some injuries-it reduces the inflammation. There are over 100 kinds of arthritis, almost all of them characterized by discomfort, pain, stiffness, fatigue and swelling of a joint. Unlike medications, which simply dull the pain, Deer Antler velvet brings relief from arthritis because it brings relief from inflammation in a natural way.
IGF-1 is currently on the World Anti-Doping Agency’s prohibited list due to how it gives athletes an unfair advantage in terms of building strength and muscle mass. (7) However, it’s still legal to use supplements that may provide IGF-1 or similar effects. Most of the studies that show positive results from using deer antler supplements have used high doses. And some have tested the product on animals (mice or rats) rather than humans.
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In Asia, velvet antler is dried and sold as slices, or as a powder which may be boiled in water, usually with other herbs and ingredients, and consumed as a medicinal soup.[6] In the traditional commercial trade of Korea and China, whole stick antler velvet is divided into three sections based upon their supposed properties. Although there is an absence of uniform standardization, these sections are known as the wax piece (uppers or tips), the blood piece (middles), and the bone piece (bottoms): the wax piece may be marketed as a growth tonic for children, the blood piece supposedly for joint and bone health, and the bone piece supposedly for calcium deficiency and geriatric needs.[2][5][9] Early commercial activity in Russia between the 1930s and 1980s led to the production of an alcohol extract from deer antler velvet marketed under the Russian drug trade name Pantocrin (also pantocrine or pantokrin).[10][11]
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