In another randomized, double blind, placebo controlled experiment (Broeder, 2004), 38 males, all of whom were experienced weightlifters, entered a 10 week strength training program. Those who took deer antler velvet experienced an increase in peak torque and average power relative to the placebo group. They also experienced unexpected improvements in aerobic performance.


This fancy concept is easily understood in the gym as increasing the contractile capacity of muscular groups. In other words, its strengthening to your body. Scientifically these concepts translate into increased anaerobic workloads and more weight for more repetitions, which is a progressive measuring standard of performance. Its about you reaching your goals. More progress for you equals more gains.
Do not be fooled by companies who make false claims and be aware that there is a difference in deer antler velvet quality and absorption rate. Nutronics Labs only utilizes Grade A New Zealand Deer Antler Velvet extract in its various IGF liposome formulations. Nutronics Labs proprietary blend of Deer Antler Velvet extract in liposome formula carries the highest potency in the world and is free of any contaminants or filler compounds.
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The truth? While research is limited, there’s nothing to suggest that deer antler velvet (or deer antler spray in the supplement form) actually does what it claims. In fact, there are two published studies (in real scientific journals, you can see them here and here) that suggest deer antler velvet does not (I repeat, does not) even elicit a hormonal response. What’s more, it also did not increase muscular strength or aerobic power.
In Russia, Korea and China, deer antler velvet is widely used by athletes to enhance performance. In the United States, more and more athletes are looking to deer antler velvet as a training aid, a promoter of recovery after physical activity and injury, and possibly an injury preventative. Deer velvet could improve athletic performance in many ways, for example by assisting strength and endurance, by supporting the oxygen-carrying capacity of the blood, by facilitating minor tissue damage, and by boosting the immune system.

Deer antler Velvet Spray – the name is already quite intriguing. This may have caught the attention of those who’ve come across the spray. And when some of them saw that this covers joint care, then those who suffer from regular pains must have wanted to try it out. And like its name, the main component comes from powdered deer antlers. This may shock some consumers, but if you will visit the website, you’ll find that the manufacturers ensure that no animals are harmed.
A growing trend in western medicine is the proliferation of influences from ancient eastern medicine. Over 2,000 years ago, the Chinese were administering deer antler velvet to treat conditions ranging from serious illnesses to lack of sexual desire. After closely examining the wide range of health benefits deer antler velvet promotes, it's no wonder why the Chinese used it as a medicine for thousands of years.

A systemic review on human interventions[25] makes note of a study conducted on patients of osteoarthritis (Edelman et al. 2000; cannot be located online) which found improvements in joint pain symptoms relative to baseline in the Velvet Antler group and not placebo, although a lack of information on blinding and randomization precludes results that can be drawn from this study.
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