The company has found that powders have only about a 15–20 percent absorption rate of IGF-1. This is due to how the digestive system breaks down the powder. Nutronics states that their “proprietary sublingual spray delivery system” is superior to many competitors because it offers “enhanced bioavailability” of IGF-1. They also point out that “it is not the milligrams of Deer Antler Velvet in the product, it’s the content of IGF-1 and other Growth Factors in Deer Antler Velvet, that makes the difference.”(6)
I am considering getting this. I have late stage lymes disease that is in my brain and nervous system and it is ruining me. I cant get help anywhere. I have gained 50 lbs even though I eat healthy after working so hard to lose 248 lbs. Its ruined my brain. I am getting very concerned I am not going to get better and have tried everything. are you still taking it since it is a year later and what have you noticed? I am 47 yr old female. If you wouldnt mind emailing me back id appreciate it. powerhouseami at gmail

Deer velvet might have an effect due to the hormones it may contain, including testosterone, androstenedione, and dehydroepiandrosterone. Research in rats, using elk velvet antler, suggested the substance may have an androgen-like effect. The antlers are ground into powder, which people take by mouth. Dosage varies by brand, but a recent study used 215 mg per day. Some distributers, though, recommend dosages ranging from 250 mg to as high as 3000 mg (3 g) per day. So talk with your doctor before you start using deer velvet.


In Russia, Korea and China, deer antler velvet is widely used by athletes to enhance performance. In the United States, more and more athletes are looking to deer antler velvet as a training aid, a promoter of recovery after physical activity and injury, and possibly an injury preventative. Deer velvet could improve athletic performance in many ways, for example by assisting strength and endurance, by supporting the oxygen-carrying capacity of the blood, by facilitating minor tissue damage, and by boosting the immune system.

“I've been taking deer antler since 2012 so I've been taking it for years and I definitely believe in it. And for recovery after hard, intense workouts, deer antler is a must. Go to AntlerFarms.com, definitely get the [deer antler velvet extract tablets] and the [deer antler velvet capsules]. Take those two in combination and you will feel great.”*


Finding the time to workout is often the biggest challenge that I have, which I’m sure a lot of you can relate to. Some weeks it’s easier to find the time than others. The problem with that is on those weeks it’s nearly impossibly to find that time, my body tends to lose what I’ve gained in the weeks that I do find the time. But that’s changed recently since I’ve started using this new supplement. It’s called IGF-1 Plus™ Formula. Since I’ve been taking IGF-1, it has been quite evident that its had a positive effect on my exercising. I feel strength and stamina that I’ve never felt before. Also my pump seems to be more phenomenal than ever! My strength has steadily increased over the six months that I’ve been spraying this under my tongue as directed daily. What’s been extremely impressive is those weeks in which I come back when I’ve been unable to workout for a week or more. I simply don’t lose what I’ve accomplished like I had before. It was almost like starting back at square on before I started using IGF-1, but now it’s like I can pick up right where I left off before! Another thing that I’d like to mention about this formula is that I feel it’s really helped my memory and my stress level. That’s a welcomed added bonus which I hadn’t counted on. Just to put this all in terms anyone can understand, let me say this… I would take this IGF-1 for simply the results I’ve been able to achieve and maintain in the gym. But add to that how it’s helped my mind, memory, and stress level, I can honestly say that you couldn’t pay me to stop taking it!!
First, the following disclaimer: Products that are sold as supplements (as opposed to medications) are not regulated by the Food and Drug Administration so they are not tested for safety, efficacy or standardization.  In other words, when you buy a supplement, there is no guarantee that what is in the bottle has been tested to see if it even contains the ingredient in question, let alone whether the ingredient actually does what it claims to.  (That’s not a value judgment, just the facts.)
A systemic review on human interventions[25] makes note of a study conducted on patients of osteoarthritis (Edelman et al. 2000; cannot be located online) which found improvements in joint pain symptoms relative to baseline in the Velvet Antler group and not placebo, although a lack of information on blinding and randomization precludes results that can be drawn from this study.
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