Well it’s been a little bit since I last talked to you Rick Lentini so I thought I would send you an email just to say hello, fill you in on how things are going out here, and see how everything is on your side of the world. Out here is all the same, its hot during the day, a little chilly at night and dusty all the time. Without breaching OPSEC I can tell you that our mission is going somewhat smooth and morale is at an all time high. We have a lot of moving parts and long days but at the end of every day the guys and myself are ready to attack the gym and get some well deserved rest just so we can wake up and do it all over again. Cpl Trousdale* and myself have made great progress in spreading the good word on IGF and have a lot of Marines, Soldiers, and Airmen, all coming back saying they are surprised with how effective IGF has been in not only their lifting but everyday work and play. OORAH to IGF! As for me, well I am just as pleased as everyone else, but more so that I’ve had the opportunity to communicate with you directly, it’s been a great pleasure. Semper Fidelis.
In Russia, Korea and China, deer antler velvet is widely used by athletes to enhance performance. In the United States, more and more athletes are looking to deer antler velvet as a training aid, a promoter of recovery after physical activity and injury, and possibly an injury preventative. Deer velvet could improve athletic performance in many ways, for example by assisting strength and endurance, by supporting the oxygen-carrying capacity of the blood, by facilitating minor tissue damage, and by boosting the immune system.

Velvet antler in the form of deer antler spray has been at the center of multiple controversies with professional sports leagues and famous athletes allegedly using it for injury recovery and performance enhancement purposes.[18] In mid-2011 a National Football League (NFL) player successfully sued a deer antler velvet spray manufacturer for testing positive for methyltestosterone in 2009 for a total amount of 5.4 million US dollars.[19][20] In August 2011, Major League Baseball (MLB) added deer antler spray to their list of prohibited items because it contains "potentially contaminated nutritional supplements." [21]


Currently, IGF-1 is banned by both the World Anti-Doping Agency and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). However, deer antler spray seems to provide only very small amounts of IGF-1. This is why it’s no longer considered illegal. Insulin-like growth factor is also naturally found in other animal-derived foods, including eggs, milk and red meat. Some experts believe that the amount of IGF-1 obtained from using deer antler products is really not much more than from eating these foods.
Andouiller de Cerf, Antler Velvet, Bois de Cerf, Bois de Cerf Rouge, Bois de Chevreuil, Bois de Velours, Bois de Wapiti, Cervus elaphus, Cervus nippon, Cornu Cervi Parvum, Deer Antler, Deer Antler Velvet, Elk Antler, Elk Antler Velvet, Horns of Gold, Lu Rong, Nokyong, Rokujo, Terciopelo de Cuerno de Venado, Velours de Cerf, Velvet Antler, Velvet Dear Antler, Velvet of Young Deer Horn.


Advanced Healing: You don’t have to be a bodybuilder, martial artist or cage fighter to appreciate fast healing. Our bodies get torn down every day from just living, walking, working and interacting with life. Deer Antler Velvet helps the body heal faster, meaning we have more energy, fewer aches and pains and less recovery time from all the things we do to ding, stress, stretch and hurt our bodies every day.
In Asia, velvet antler is dried and sold as slices, or as a powder which may be boiled in water, usually with other herbs and ingredients, and consumed as a medicinal soup.[6] In the traditional commercial trade of Korea and China, whole stick antler velvet is divided into three sections based upon their supposed properties. Although there is an absence of uniform standardization, these sections are known as the wax piece (uppers or tips), the blood piece (middles), and the bone piece (bottoms): the wax piece may be marketed as a growth tonic for children, the blood piece supposedly for joint and bone health, and the bone piece supposedly for calcium deficiency and geriatric needs.[2][5][9] Early commercial activity in Russia between the 1930s and 1980s led to the production of an alcohol extract from deer antler velvet marketed under the Russian drug trade name Pantocrin (also pantocrine or pantokrin).[10][11]
×