Now, you’ll probably read a lot about the power of IGF-1 in many reports about Ray Lewis. And while it’s true that IGF-1 is illegal in man-made form, let’s not mistake illegal products (because they are synthetic) with guaranteed amazing results. IGF-1 can have a significant impact on your body, but it’s not that easy to get the levels you need from deer antler. In fact, given what’s in a typical bottle, it is damn near impossible.
In a randomized, placebo controlled test in 2004, researchers at the University of Alberta, Canada, placed 18 males from the Edmonton Police Force into a 9 week strength training program. The results showed that deer antler velvet increased the strength and endurance of the subjects relative to the control group. The researchers found that use of deer antler velvet significantly increased blood plasma testosterone levels. 

We know about growth factors, such as IGF-1, which are responsible for promoting healthy hormones. It is the synergy of all the constituents that help these growth factors work better. And this is why our deer antler velvet is so awesome! If you go read other labels and check the magic "extract-ratios" and micro-nanogram amounts, you'll discover something interesting:

For women, deer antler velvet can help ease the symptoms associated with pre-menstruation by relieving cramps, suppressing mood swings, and raising energy levels. It is also used to treat vaginal discharges, uterine bleeding, menstrual disorders, infertility, and menopause. Russian researchers claim that compounds found in deer antler velvet can ease the effects of menopause in women.
Ultimately it is too early in the testing process for our experts to be able to recommend Deer Antler Velvet Spray as either safe or effective as a joint health supplement. It is more possible it is effective as a male libido enhancer than as a nutritional supplement, and there is little reason to think that Deer Antler Velvet Spray could do much to actually contribute to the health of the body’s connective tissues. It does not have any anti-inflammatory agents to fight joint pain, there is only the smallest amount of glucosamine and chondroitin, and finally the potential for negative consequences is too high for our team to be able to encourage our readers to consume this product.
In an ovalbumin sensitized mouse model, 4 weeks of Velvet Antler at 2.5-10mg total (weight of mice not given, assuming 20g this equals 125-500mg/kg or 10-40mg/kg for humans) was able to reduce total Immunoglobulin E (IgE) and Ovalbumin-specific IgE at 14, 21, and 28 days.[21] When challenged with methacholine and subsequently having their airway power measured, it appeared that Velvet Antler exert anti-asthmatic effects in regards to allergies.[21] 
New Zealand research reports that although the mechanism is unknown, deer antler velvet shows strong anti-inflammatory effects. Recent clinical tests suggest oral ingestion of glycosaminoglycan-peptide complex, or components such as chondroitin sulfate and glucosamine sulfate — both found in deer antler velvet — may help stimulate cartilage repair.

According to an article in Sports Illustrated, Lewis spoke by telephone after his injury with Mitch Ross, co-owner of the supplement company S.W.A.T.S. (Sports with Alternatives to Steroids) to ask about treatments that could speed his recovery. Sports Illustrated reported that among Ross’ recommendations were deer antler pills to “rebuild your brain via your small intestines.” In addition to recommending the pills, Ross reportedly also told Lewis to spray deer antler extract under his tongue. Lewis has denied following this advice, and Ravens’ management has said that the star player has never flunked a drug test.
Sourced from New Zealand, Piping Rock’s IGF-1+ extra strength Deer Antler Velvet Spray taps into ancient practices famously exploring male virility.** Each spray contains the beneficial amino acids, peptides, proteins and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1+) naturally found in deer velvet, making this spray a popular choice among athletes, fitness enthusiasts and those who are looking to support muscle strength, stamina, vitality and overall male performance.**
Dr. Low Dog also reports that a chronic wasting disease in deer, elk and moose is the only recognized prion (infectious protein) disease of wild animals and has been found in 15 states and two provinces in Canada. (Prion diseases in wild animals are similar to bovine spongiform encephalopathy, better known as mad cow disease, in cattle.) No known cases of neurological disease have been seen in humans who have taken deer antler velvet supplements, but a 2009 study sponsored by the National Institutes of Neurological Diseases and Stroke and the U.S. Department of Agriculture concluded that the possibility remains.
Performance - Borrowing the scientific research, its mandatory use by the Soviets has shown increased blood circulatory benefits, liver protective attributes and nerve strengthening effects of the aqueous alcohol extract.* This means it increases nervous innervation, easily known as the contractile capacity of muscle groups.* This leads to short burst style athletic performance increases found in weightlifting, bodybuilding, and similar sports.*

In Asia, velvet antler is dried and sold as slices, or as a powder which may be boiled in water, usually with other herbs and ingredients, and consumed as a medicinal soup.[6] In the traditional commercial trade of Korea and China, whole stick antler velvet is divided into three sections based upon their supposed properties. Although there is an absence of uniform standardization, these sections are known as the wax piece (uppers or tips), the blood piece (middles), and the bone piece (bottoms): the wax piece may be marketed as a growth tonic for children, the blood piece supposedly for joint and bone health, and the bone piece supposedly for calcium deficiency and geriatric needs.[2][5][9] Early commercial activity in Russia between the 1930s and 1980s led to the production of an alcohol extract from deer antler velvet marketed under the Russian drug trade name Pantocrin (also pantocrine or pantokrin).[10][11]

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