Being a former collegiate athlete, I’m no stranger to working out. When a former teammate of mine started talking about this new, state of the art, health product and the effects he was getting from it, it peaked my interest needless to say. I remember him continually saying that I’d have to try it to believe what it does for you. Wow, I must now say that I know what he means (and then some)! First of all, this IGF-1 Plus™ Formula did have some impressive results for me in my workouts. It’s not only helped my strength, but it seems that I especially notice a difference in my joints and my recovery time. Since I lift with heavy weights, my joints used to ache after working out, but they no longer do! My endurance also has really improved as well. I’ve actually doubled the time and distance that I was doing before (and I’ve only been on it for a little over a month)! An unexpected (but much welcomed) improvement that has been incredible is in how clearly I’ve been able to think and I feel very little stress anymore. It almost like someone put a micro-computer chip in my brain that makes it work much more efficiently without trying nearly as hard. It’s one of those things that you have to try to really believe it (trust me, it has done much more than I expected it to). I look forward to turning a friend of mine on to it, since he’s a personal trainer and trains professional athletes! Thanks, Dr. Duarte. I plan to use your IGF-1 Plus™ from now on, and will stock up so I don’t run out!


Yes, the Soviets had even been involved in extensive research to ascertain the performance benefits of deer antler velvet. But they've been using it for awhile. In their country it was known in Russian folk use to be a warming and vitalizing food several hundred years ago, but with the advent of modern history, they began research nearly 90 years ago.

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My name is Michael Morabe and I’ve been an avid and addict of sand and indoor volleyball. I’m 27 years old and after getting back into volleyball 2 years ago, I realized I needed to lose weight. I just played more and more, shedding weight pretty rapidly, but after I lost about 35-40 pounds, I couldn’t do much more without starting to diet. The added problem was my recovery after playing so much during a week whether it be pick up or tournaments.
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In Asia, velvet antler is dried and sold as slices, or as a powder which may be boiled in water, usually with other herbs and ingredients, and consumed as a medicinal soup.[6] In the traditional commercial trade of Korea and China, whole stick antler velvet is divided into three sections based upon their supposed properties. Although there is an absence of uniform standardization, these sections are known as the wax piece (uppers or tips), the blood piece (middles), and the bone piece (bottoms): the wax piece may be marketed as a growth tonic for children, the blood piece supposedly for joint and bone health, and the bone piece supposedly for calcium deficiency and geriatric needs.[2][5][9] Early commercial activity in Russia between the 1930s and 1980s led to the production of an alcohol extract from deer antler velvet marketed under the Russian drug trade name Pantocrin (also pantocrine or pantokrin).[10][11]
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