In a randomized, placebo controlled test in 2004, researchers at the University of Alberta, Canada, placed 18 males from the Edmonton Police Force into a 9 week strength training program. The results showed that deer antler velvet increased the strength and endurance of the subjects relative to the control group. The researchers found that use of deer antler velvet significantly increased blood plasma testosterone levels. 
A Russian study indicated that the amino acids, polypeptides and other compounds found in antler increased the survival rate of mice with cancerous tumors as much as 40 percent. In addition, a study conducted by the East-West Research Institute in Korea found that deer antler velvet appears to increase neutrophil levels in mice, which boost the body’s ability to fight injuries and disease. The mice with tumors lost less weight and suffered lower levels of kidney damage than those treated with drugs.
Repeated studies have been conducted on the interactions of Velvet Antler and hormones, and all studies have found that this supplement has failed to increase circulating hormone levels. One study found a highly variable increase in power output, which is antagonized by another study suggesting no significant increase in power. For the purposes of performance enhancement, the evidence does not currently support Velvet Antler as a supplement.
Deer antler velvet can play a pivotal role in helping to not only relieve the symptoms of diseases that affect joints, such as osteoarthritis, they can possibly eliminate them entirely. The way it may do this is through the introduction of chondroitin sulfate and glucosamine sulfate into the body. Both of these compounds are abundant in deer antler velvet.
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