Suggested use: Take one tablet 20-30 minutes prior to your two main meals of the day with 8oz. glass of water. You may also use Nutronics Labs Weight Loss Plus in conjunction with any of our IGF-1 liposome spray products for optimal results. Caution: Do not use if outer seal is broken. Not intended for individuals under the age of 18. Consult your health care provider prior to use if you are pregnant or nursing, have a medical condition, or when taking any medication.
Insulin-like Growth Factor 1 (IGF-1) is an anabolic molecule which appears to induce growth of the antlers themselves,[31][32] although testosterone may be the primary growth factor.[33] Currently, there is no evidence that serum IGF-1 is increased following Velvet Antler ingestion with one study using 1.5g of Velvet Antler for 11 weeks failing to increase serum IGF-1.[26]
Assuming that deer antler velvet is the next biggest thing in muscle building and athletics isn’t just a massive leap of faith, it’s something that can’t be supported by science in any way, shape, or form. So why is it illegal? Because it’s still a synthetic, man-made growth hormone precursor. Those are illegal, according to most professional sports.
I would like to express my deepest gratitude for IGF-1. I am 54 years old and until now I have suffered with chronic fatigue, depression and insomnia. After being on IGF-1 for less than 1 month, my energy levels are back up and improving more everyday. I once took 3 naps per day just to function, I do not need naps anymore. I once needed prescription sleeps aids, now I sleep all night long without medication, thanks to IGF-1. It is hard to put into words all that IGF-1 is doing for me, so I will just say I feel like a new man with vitality that I have not felt in 25 years.
Dr. Low Dog also reports that a chronic wasting disease in deer, elk and moose is the only recognized prion (infectious protein) disease of wild animals and has been found in 15 states and two provinces in Canada. (Prion diseases in wild animals are similar to bovine spongiform encephalopathy, better known as mad cow disease, in cattle.) No known cases of neurological disease have been seen in humans who have taken deer antler velvet supplements, but a 2009 study sponsored by the National Institutes of Neurological Diseases and Stroke and the U.S. Department of Agriculture concluded that the possibility remains.
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IGF-1 is currently on the World Anti-Doping Agency’s prohibited list due to how it gives athletes an unfair advantage in terms of building strength and muscle mass. (7) However, it’s still legal to use supplements that may provide IGF-1 or similar effects. Most of the studies that show positive results from using deer antler supplements have used high doses. And some have tested the product on animals (mice or rats) rather than humans.
In Asia, velvet antler is dried and sold as slices, or as a powder which may be boiled in water, usually with other herbs and ingredients, and consumed as a medicinal soup.[6] In the traditional commercial trade of Korea and China, whole stick antler velvet is divided into three sections based upon their supposed properties. Although there is an absence of uniform standardization, these sections are known as the wax piece (uppers or tips), the blood piece (middles), and the bone piece (bottoms): the wax piece may be marketed as a growth tonic for children, the blood piece supposedly for joint and bone health, and the bone piece supposedly for calcium deficiency and geriatric needs.[2][5][9] Early commercial activity in Russia between the 1930s and 1980s led to the production of an alcohol extract from deer antler velvet marketed under the Russian drug trade name Pantocrin (also pantocrine or pantokrin).[10][11]
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