Being a former collegiate athlete, I’m no stranger to working out. When a former teammate of mine started talking about this new, state of the art, health product and the effects he was getting from it, it peaked my interest needless to say. I remember him continually saying that I’d have to try it to believe what it does for you. Wow, I must now say that I know what he means (and then some)! First of all, this IGF-1 Plus™ Formula did have some impressive results for me in my workouts. It’s not only helped my strength, but it seems that I especially notice a difference in my joints and my recovery time. Since I lift with heavy weights, my joints used to ache after working out, but they no longer do! My endurance also has really improved as well. I’ve actually doubled the time and distance that I was doing before (and I’ve only been on it for a little over a month)! An unexpected (but much welcomed) improvement that has been incredible is in how clearly I’ve been able to think and I feel very little stress anymore. It almost like someone put a micro-computer chip in my brain that makes it work much more efficiently without trying nearly as hard. It’s one of those things that you have to try to really believe it (trust me, it has done much more than I expected it to). I look forward to turning a friend of mine on to it, since he’s a personal trainer and trains professional athletes! Thanks, Dr. Duarte. I plan to use your IGF-1 Plus™ from now on, and will stock up so I don’t run out!
One double-blind study published in the International Journal of Sports Nutrition and Exercise Metabolism tested whether or not deer antler velvet powder or extract had an impact on aerobic performance, endurance and “trainability of muscular strength” compared to a placebo. The subjects were adult males. They were given either a placebo, or deer antler extract or powder supplementation over a  10-week period while undergoing a strength-building routine. The men were measured for muscular strength, endurance, and VO2max before and after using deer antler. These results were determined by measuring circulating levels of testosterone, insulin-like growth factor, erythropoietin, red cell mass, plasma volume, and total blood volume.
A systemic review on human interventions[25] makes note of a study conducted on patients of osteoarthritis (Edelman et al. 2000; cannot be located online) which found improvements in joint pain symptoms relative to baseline in the Velvet Antler group and not placebo, although a lack of information on blinding and randomization precludes results that can be drawn from this study.
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