L-Arginine: An amino acid usually found in red meats that is important for the body’s ability to manufacture proteins. L-Arginine has been used to treat conditions like high blood pressure, congestive heart failure, blocked arteries, and erectile dysfunction. L-Arginine is safe for most people, however it should not be taken by women that are pregnant or breastfeeding.
The information on this website has not been evaluated by the Food & Drug Administration or any other medical body. We do not aim to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any illness or disease. Information is shared for educational purposes only. You must consult your doctor before acting on any content on this website, especially if you are pregnant, nursing, taking medication or have a medical condition.
Bottom line: Rogol says it’s “extremely unlikely” that deer antler in any form could offer athletes a boost. “Deer antlers do contain growth factors,” he explains. But it’s a huge leap of faith to talk about an extract doing anything beneficial for human beings, whether it’s slowing aging, developing muscle, or repairing tendons, he adds. Opinions like Rogol’s are one reason the FDA and anti-doping agencies haven’t yet taken steps to ban deer antler products that contain IGF-1.

Some people use deer velvet to increase levels of certain sex hormones (estrogen and testosterone), improve fertility, increase interest in sexual activity (as an aphrodisiac), and treat male sexual performance problems (erectile dysfunction, ED). Women use deer velvet to reduce the dose of estrogen they need in hormone replacement therapy. They also use it for menstrual and menopause problems, vaginal discharges, and uterine bleeding.

Assuming that deer antler velvet is the next biggest thing in muscle building and athletics isn’t just a massive leap of faith, it’s something that can’t be supported by science in any way, shape, or form. So why is it illegal? Because it’s still a synthetic, man-made growth hormone precursor. Those are illegal, according to most professional sports.


The best part about our 100% top grade health supplement line? No major side effects! Regardless of your age or activity level, any of our formulas can help you safely raise your IGF-1 levels. If you are serious about working out (as are professional athletes, bodybuilders, Ironman competitors, etc…), or suffer from a debilitating ailment (such as fibromyalgia, MS, diabetes, acute inflammation, etc…) Nutronics’ natural remedies can help you. If you are just trying to stay fit, get into shape, or don’t exercise at all, Nutronics Labs IGF-1 Plus can help you live the healthiest lifestyle possible! Nutronics Labs hit the market over 25 years ago and is still the leading provider of completely natural and safe IGF-1 deer antler velvet supplements. Accept no substitutions.
"Earlier this year, March and April, I purchased a total of 2 bottles of Nutronics Lab’s Starter spray. A tad bit about me: I have a Bachelors in Psychology and a PhD. in life so to speak. I do much research on many different topics, all the way down to these new (terrible research chemicals) that are starting to negatively affect our society. Yes, I am a recovering addict and work with them by the way, so I know much about the brain and it’s physiological aspects. No, I am not a doctor though.
On January 30, 2013, Vijay Singh professional PGA Tour golfer was caught unaware and openly admitted to the personal use of deer antler spray which contained a banned substance at the time.[22] A week later the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) lifted the ban on deer antler spray, but with urgency, "Deer Antler Velvet Spray may contain IGF-1 and WADA recommends therefore that athletes be extremely vigilant with this supplement because it could lead to a positive test." [23] The consensus opinion of leading endocrinologists concerning any purported claims and benefits "is simply that there is far too little of the substance in even the purest forms of the spray to make any difference," [9] and "there is no medically valid way to deliver IGF-1 orally or in a spray." [24]
"I was diagnosed with Muscular Dystrophy at the age of 3. For those of you who do not know Muscular Dystrophy is a disease that essentially means muscles with bad nutrition. My results with this product have been phenomenal. I've definitely noticed an increase in energy, definitely strength. I went from 12 reps to 43 reps in just five weeks. There is something special about this product."*

I recently ordered IGF-1 Plus Maximum in order to gain results from my physical therapy workouts. Since using this product, I am not only able to do harder workouts, but I also have increased muscle mass. Besides these benefits I have experienced improvement in my wound healing! Areas that repeatedly break down are showing increased healing like never before. My hands, which are severely scarred, have more flexibility. I look forward to the many benefits that may come from using IGF-1. Thank you Rick Lentini!
Andouiller de Cerf, Antler Velvet, Bois de Cerf, Bois de Cerf Rouge, Bois de Chevreuil, Bois de Velours, Bois de Wapiti, Cervus elaphus, Cervus nippon, Cornu Cervi Parvum, Deer Antler, Deer Antler Velvet, Elk Antler, Elk Antler Velvet, Horns of Gold, Lu Rong, Nokyong, Rokujo, Terciopelo de Cuerno de Venado, Velours de Cerf, Velvet Antler, Velvet Dear Antler, Velvet of Young Deer Horn.


In Asia, velvet antler is dried and sold as slices, or as a powder which may be boiled in water, usually with other herbs and ingredients, and consumed as a medicinal soup.[6] In the traditional commercial trade of Korea and China, whole stick antler velvet is divided into three sections based upon their supposed properties. Although there is an absence of uniform standardization, these sections are known as the wax piece (uppers or tips), the blood piece (middles), and the bone piece (bottoms): the wax piece may be marketed as a growth tonic for children, the blood piece supposedly for joint and bone health, and the bone piece supposedly for calcium deficiency and geriatric needs.[2][5][9] Early commercial activity in Russia between the 1930s and 1980s led to the production of an alcohol extract from deer antler velvet marketed under the Russian drug trade name Pantocrin (also pantocrine or pantokrin).[10][11]
×