One double-blind study published in the International Journal of Sports Nutrition and Exercise Metabolism tested whether or not deer antler velvet powder or extract had an impact on aerobic performance, endurance and “trainability of muscular strength” compared to a placebo. The subjects were adult males. They were given either a placebo, or deer antler extract or powder supplementation over a  10-week period while undergoing a strength-building routine. The men were measured for muscular strength, endurance, and VO2max before and after using deer antler. These results were determined by measuring circulating levels of testosterone, insulin-like growth factor, erythropoietin, red cell mass, plasma volume, and total blood volume.

Most of the world's supply of velvet antler comes from Sika deer, red deer and elk or wapiti, including a large deer ranching industry in New Zealand. New Zealand is the world’s largest producer of velvet, producing 450-500 tons of red deer velvet antler annually.[1] China produces 400 tons of predominantly Sika deer velvet antler annually. Russia produces 80 tons annually. United States and Canada each produce 20 tons annually.[2]
Find testimonials on antler velvet in general, or opinions on specific brands: Another great thing about our site, is that we have testimonials and opinions for deer antler velvet in general, as well as opinions on how specific brands compare against each other. Start by learning if deer antler velvet is right for you, then compare brand specific reviews to find the best product available for your needs and price range.
A study (Yudin and Dobyrakov, 1974) on the effect of deer antler velvet extract on the static load-bearing capacity of subjects found that those who took the extract increased the time of work by 2-4 seconds compared to the control group. In tests of dynamic work using a veloergometer, the subjects who took the extract increased the work output 4 to 5 times more than the control group.

Most of the world's supply of velvet antler comes from Sika deer, red deer and elk or wapiti, including a large deer ranching industry in New Zealand. New Zealand is the world’s largest producer of velvet, producing 450-500 tons of red deer velvet antler annually.[1] China produces 400 tons of predominantly Sika deer velvet antler annually. Russia produces 80 tons annually. United States and Canada each produce 20 tons annually.[2]


I am a cancer survivor from 1993. I started using IGF-1 in October 2001. The Cancer I had in ’93 had a 0 survivor rate, but through God, nutrition and supplements I healed. Still, I was left with intense pain, chronic fatigue, and other damage done by the cancer. IGF-1 is now one supplement I will not do without, no way, period. IGF-1 has virtually helped me rebuild my body from the vast cancer induced damage. I am now not only pain free, I am also surfing at 46 years young with the teenagers and physically cannot be held back. I have increased lean muscle mass, the silver in my hair has disappeared and my vision has returned to full focus. I more than highly recommend IGF-1 to everyone wishing to be youthful in body and mind. Thank you and congratulations on the most important find in our century.


"Here's my advice to you. Find a product that contains the right kind of high quality grass fed whey protein isolate and is sweetened with the right kind of sweetener. I did want to give a shout out to Antler Farms® who has a nice, high quality New Zealand Whey Protein Isolate. They've gone the extra mile in a lot of different directions. I like to give shout outs to companies that I think deserve it and actually care about our health."*

Speed Exercise Recovery - Depends which way you look at, but in general it really depends on why you would need it. If you think this works like synthetic anabolics that helps you recover quicker and train more you are grossly mistaken. But if you have joint issues, or desire the benefits of increased blood flow assisting and conversion in the liver, or need a boost to tissue regeneration than this is smarter thinking on your part.

Assuming that deer antler velvet is the next biggest thing in muscle building and athletics isn’t just a massive leap of faith, it’s something that can’t be supported by science in any way, shape, or form. So why is it illegal? Because it’s still a synthetic, man-made growth hormone precursor. Those are illegal, according to most professional sports.
Reports claim deer antler helped Ray Lewis overcome his recent triceps tear, and Vijay Singh has admitted to using a spray supplement. University of Alabama football players also allegedly used deer antler sprays leading up to the 2013 BCS National Title Game. Whether or not those reports are true, one thing is certain: There’s not much proof that deer antler is a performance enhancer or a miraculous healer.
Deer antlers have been closely linked to IGF-1, which is another term for insulin. This has been well received in eastern medicine as an anti-aging and bodybuilding product. Because it’s also a known natural growth hormone, it’s said to aid in muscle development by enhancing strength and improving recovery time. This is what attracts bodybuilders to this product.
Deer antler velvet can act as a natural adaptogen, restoring homeostasis to an unbalanced body by helping where it is needed. Deer antler velvet has an effect on many systems of the body given its complex chemical composition. The active ingredients in deer antler velvet are mostly precursors that are required by the body to process substances that maintain its health and wellbeing.
When antlers fall off, they leave wounds that heal quickly, without forming a scar. Researchers have found that velvet antler contains substances that encourage healing, and could be of use to humans. Of particular interest are 3 hormones known to promote growth of skin tissue: insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1), epidermal growth factor (EGF) and transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1). In a recent study, an ointment made from velvet antler, containing these compounds, enhanced healing when applied to the skin of rats. IGF-1 was a hot topic in the media in the winter of 2013 when a football player, Ray Lewis, was accused of using a banned spray containing IGF-1.

In 1989, fitness expert John Abdo, who trained numerous Olympic and world class athletes, visited the Institute of Physical Culture in Moscow to investigate Russian training routines. At that time, Russian athletes underwent a dramatic increase in the success in weightlifting competitions. John met with former Soviet weight-lifting champion Victor Sheynkin and training expert Yuri Verhoshansky. John learned that their athletes had experienced considerable improvement in performance with deer antler velvet.  Dr Arkady Koltun, Chaiman of the Medical Committee for the Russian Bodybuilding Federation, and an expert on anabolic agents confirmed that deer antler velvet increases muscular strength and speeds recovery after exercise.
Tanejeva also tested the effect of deer antler velvet in athletes running three kilometer races. In the experiment, 50 men ran the distance and their completion time was recorded. Deer antler velvet extract was administered to half of the runners and the participants repeated the race.  The group receiving the Pantocrin completed the subsequent race in a faster average time.
Data is limited. Two studies (n=40 and 168) investigating the efficacy of elk velvet antler supplementation on rheumatoid arthritis found no effect, while a study conducted in people with osteoarthritis (n=53) reported symptomatic relief among participants. The small sample sizes may result in the trials being underpowered to detect effects.25, 28, 29

Chondroitin sulfate is a compound of connective tissues that are usually found in cartilage. Glucosamine sulfate is a natural building block for the growth and maintenance of healthy cartilage. Since osteoarthritis is caused by the deterioration of the cartilage in the bone joints, a daily supplement of deer antler velvet can help to stimulate the repair of deteriorated bone cartilage with healthy doses of chondroitin sulfate and glucosamine sulfate.

I am sure we will want to discover the truth and go buy he easy to read and well cited book to make your own study. She has a earned a PhD in nutrition. Written 500 articles, been on talk radio, on TV, in Time Magazine, Prevention Magazine and written up in the New York Times a couple times. Okay sure, so what did her book say? This is where it starts to get good...
I took red mountain deer velvet and it really messed my stomach up. I now have cramps and bloating all the time plus it feels like my stomach shrank…I can’t eat like I used to. It was a big mistake to take that stuff. Do you know of any way I can get my stomach back to normal??? Can you recommend someone who knows a lot about deer velvet?? I have been suffering terribly since I took that junk…it’s been about 2 years now!!!! My stomach has never been the same since I took that poison!!
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