The appropriate dose of deer velvet depends on several factors such as the user's age, health, and several other conditions. At this time there is not enough scientific information to determine an appropriate range of doses for deer velvet. Keep in mind that natural products are not always necessarily safe and dosages can be important. Be sure to follow relevant directions on product labels and consult your pharmacist or physician or other healthcare professional before using.
Although the site states that this product shouldn’t cause ill side effects, most western medical practitioners would dissuade you from taking this because the components found in deer antlers haven’t been approved by the FDA. More importantly, IGF-1 has been proven unstable. So, it’s best to speak to your physician, especially when you’re currently taking other forms of medication.
Blood Pressure: Almost 30% of Americans (28.7%) have high blood pressure. If you’re 60 years of age, 65.4% of your age group has it. If you’re black, 33.5% vs. 28.7% of whites, have high blood pressure. It’s a very common problem-and only gets worse as we age. So why should you worry about your blood pressure? Because high blood pressure is the cause of heart attacks, stroke, blindness, kidney disease and failure and death to name a few reasons. Did you know that 5 million people in US have high blood pressure, including those getting treated for it? But wait-almost 40 million people don’t know they have it, aren’t getting it treated or can’t control it adequately! Are you one of them? Ask your doctor. Deer Antler Velvet has been shown to reduce high blood pressure naturally, without side effects and without interfering with any medication you’re already on.
I know of no scientific evidence to support any of the marketing claims made for these supplements. I discussed your question with Tieraona Low Dog, M.D., an internationally recognized expert in the fields of integrative medicine, dietary supplements and women’s health, and an authority on botanical medicine. She explains that IGF-1 in the velvet promotes rapid growth of the antler. Dr. Low Dog notes that the two studies examining the effects of deer antler velvet supplements taken by athletes have yielded conflicting results. One showed some improvements in endurance and knee strength in weightlifters, but the other found no differences in rowers after 10 weeks of supplementation.

Fat Metabolism* -Besides containing a plethora of nutrition, such as peptides, growth factors and important minerals, which may help to prevent cravings, deer antler velvet also contains ursolic acid, which may be beneficial for increasing fat metabolism, we can, with a little effort and motivational boost, achieve a leaner and firmer physique.* Additionally, research in other fields suggests that it may be responsible for a smaller waist.*
All groups experienced a significant improvement in strength. But the deer antler powder group showed the greatest increase in isokinetic knee extensor strength and endurance. However, it’s possible that this was due to exercise program rather than using the deer antler powder. None of the men in any group showed evidence of endocrine, red cell mass or VO2max changes. Therefore, researchers concluded that the “findings do not support an erythropoetic or aerobic ergogenic effect of deer antler velvet.” (12) On the other hand, this was a small study, with only 12-13 men in each group. This means that further testing is needed to confirm the validity of the results.
Moose, elk and deer produce new antlers yearly (primarily males, except in caribou/reindeer). In New Zealand, deer are subject to local anesthesia and restrained during antler removal, and the procedure is supervised by licensed veterinarians.[3][4] Typically, the antler is cut off near the base after it is about two-thirds of its potential full size, between 55 and 65 days of growth, before any significant calcification occurs.[4] The procedure is generally done around June in the Northern Hemisphere and December in the Southern Hemisphere.[5]
A Russian study indicated that the amino acids, polypeptides and other compounds found in antler increased the survival rate of mice with cancerous tumors as much as 40 percent. In addition, a study conducted by the East-West Research Institute in Korea found that deer antler velvet appears to increase neutrophil levels in mice, which boost the body’s ability to fight injuries and disease. The mice with tumors lost less weight and suffered lower levels of kidney damage than those treated with drugs.

Deer Antler Velvet Extract: This moss-like substance has been used in Chinese medicine for years and is thought to contain a number of compounds that can help with tissue regeneration and repair. The antlers are removed safely and without harm to the animal, and the velvet is thought to have applications for improving circulation, strengthening bone density, and improving male libido. There is very little clinical data regarding the effects of deer velvet, and not much is known about its side effects. Some conditions that may potentially be related to deer antler velvet include:


In Asia, velvet antler is dried and sold as slices, or as a powder which may be boiled in water, usually with other herbs and ingredients, and consumed as a medicinal soup.[6] In the traditional commercial trade of Korea and China, whole stick antler velvet is divided into three sections based upon their supposed properties. Although there is an absence of uniform standardization, these sections are known as the wax piece (uppers or tips), the blood piece (middles), and the bone piece (bottoms): the wax piece may be marketed as a growth tonic for children, the blood piece supposedly for joint and bone health, and the bone piece supposedly for calcium deficiency and geriatric needs.[2][5][9] Early commercial activity in Russia between the 1930s and 1980s led to the production of an alcohol extract from deer antler velvet marketed under the Russian drug trade name Pantocrin (also pantocrine or pantokrin).[10][11]
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