From cave people to you and me. Deer antler is easily consumed as a nutritional source for over 2000 years of recorded history, and no doubt long prior to the written word. Old school energy for modern stress. Used as a trophy from hunters, deer antler has been used as a superfood high in unique protein that will strengthen tissues and increase resistance to physical stress. Later, you'll see more about how that has become science today.
The word antler is derived from the Latin Anteoculae, meaning "in front of the eyes." Antlers are present in almost all members of the deer family Cervidae. The first documented evidence of deer velvet as a medicinal was found on a scroll recovered from a tomb in Hunan China dating back 2000 years. The use of antler dates back to the Han Dynasty 206 BC to 220 AD. A 16th century medical text, Pen Ts'ao Kang Mu, lists several antler preparations including pills, tinctures, and ointments. In traditional Chinese medicine, velvet antler has been used for over 2000 years as a tonic, to improve bone health, to nourish the blood, reduce swelling, and to treat impotence. Later research on deer antler dates back to the 1980s in Russia. Hundreds of articles have since been published including those documented by Chinese, Korean, and Japanese scientists.14, 15

As men and women get older, they naturally start producing less Human Growth Hormone (HGH). So levels of IGF-1 also decline with age. The liver produces IGF-1 when HGH is released.  HGH is converted to IGF-1. Aside from someone’s age, IGF-1 levels will vary depending on a person’s sex (men generally have more), level of activity, their diet, genetics and lifestyle.
My name is William Gucciardo. I am fifty-four years old and have been exercising and taking nutritional supplementation for many years. I was recently introduced to IGF-1, and have been taking it for three weeks. Although I have been working out six days a week for the past several years, I have recently noticed an increase in upper body muscle tone and overall strength and endurance. I have also noticed that minor stiffness that I daily experienced upon arising in the morning is gone. My body feels stronger with an overall feeling of well being. I can only attribute these changes to the addition of IGF-1 to my supplementation program, as this is the only change that I have recently made. I do not know what further benefits I will receive from taking IGF-1 daily. If you are willing to try something new with the possibility of improving your health and well being, I would recommend trying this product.
The appropriate dose of deer velvet depends on several factors such as the user's age, health, and several other conditions. At this time there is not enough scientific information to determine an appropriate range of doses for deer velvet. Keep in mind that natural products are not always necessarily safe and dosages can be important. Be sure to follow relevant directions on product labels and consult your pharmacist or physician or other healthcare professional before using.
In herbal combinations, deer velvet is used to improve athletic performance; to improve eyesight and hearing; to reduce stress; and to treat arthritis, osteoporosis, “tired blood” (anemia), women’s reproductive disorders including premenstrual syndrome (PMS), ED, and skin conditions. Herbal combinations including deer velvet are also used to increase blood circulation to the brain and to delay or reduce signs of aging such as tissue, bone, and muscle degeneration, and declining mental skills.

In a randomized, placebo controlled test in 2004, researchers at the University of Alberta, Canada, placed 18 males from the Edmonton Police Force into a 9 week strength training program. The results showed that deer antler velvet increased the strength and endurance of the subjects relative to the control group. The researchers found that use of deer antler velvet significantly increased blood plasma testosterone levels. 
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