Research has been conducted on the potential use of deer antler velvet for healing of wounds. In Russia (Arapov, 1969), Pantocrin was administered to patients with surgical and internal wounds. The study reported that there were a number of positive effects, including the normalization of arterial pressure, reduction in surgical complications, and becoming active quicker. In tests on rats (Wang, 1985), bone fracture repair was accelerated. A recent study by Bubenik found that antler helped heal epidermal wounds in rats. In another study by Takikawa, et al., researchers reported observing new bone formation following experimental whiplash injuries in rabbits. Pretreatment in rats reduced cell degradation and improved recovery times from extreme temperature and electric shock exposure. 
"I am 60 years old and had polio when I was six months old. Throughout my childhood I had 7 orthopedic surgeries to correct the damage leftover by polio to my left hip, leg and foot. I am battle scarred and a Post Polio Syndrome Survivor. I cannot praise your product enough! Its difficult for me to walk. I normally use a battery powered scooter in malls and airports. The least amount of physical exertion walking and standing creates days of agony afterwards. This past Saturday I walked the mall, went for a movie and dinner. I was active all day and well into the night without tiring. I kept waiting for the intense painful spasms and muscle contractions from my polio atrophied muscles in the left leg and also my hips. Usually late at night is when the pain and spasms are the most intense. But guess what? I am not hurting anywhere near the level I use too. I am not fatigued. I used Antler Farm's Deer Antler Velvet a couple of years ago when traveling to Machu Picchu, Peru. I am still amazed I climbed the ancient Inca Trail unaided with just my cane. Antler Farm's Deer Antler Velvet has improved my quality of life significantly."*
Even more intriguing is how the stags manage to regrow their antlers. Scientists have found stem cells at the bases of antlers’essentially ‘blank’ cells that can develop into many different types of cell, such as a skin cell or a cartilage cell. If they could find out what triggers the stem cells and controls their development into antlers, the knowledge could be applied to the regeneration of human limbs and organs. Scientists know that the shedding is initiated by a fall in the hormone testosterone, a change linked to an increase in day length, and they think oestrogen may be a key cellular regulator. However, much more research on a molecular level is required to unravel what is clearly an intricate process.
Other uses include treatment of high cholesterol, high blood pressure, migraines, muscle aches and pains, asthma, indigestion, weak bones (osteoporosis), headache, liver and kidney disorders, cold hands and feet, soreness and weakness in the lower back and knees, chronic skin ulcers, and overactive bladder. It is also used to promote youthfulness, sharpen thinking skills, protect the liver from toxins, stimulate production and circulation of blood, and increase the number of red blood cells.
New Zealand research reports that although the mechanism is unknown, deer antler velvet shows strong anti-inflammatory effects. Recent clinical tests suggest oral ingestion of glycosaminoglycan-peptide complex, or components such as chondroitin sulfate and glucosamine sulfate — both found in deer antler velvet — may help stimulate cartilage repair.
A systemic review on human interventions[25] makes note of a study conducted on patients of osteoarthritis (Edelman et al. 2000; cannot be located online) which found improvements in joint pain symptoms relative to baseline in the Velvet Antler group and not placebo, although a lack of information on blinding and randomization precludes results that can be drawn from this study.
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