Tonic Adaptogen* - This is a fancy concept that references the research into supplements that elicit a strengthening effect on the body and its systems.* They are tonic in action and stimulate clean holistic energy and prevent fatigue while helping us to overcome stress and maintain strong immune systems.* Due to some of the following actions we will see that this stress adaptation is generally physical in nature.
I never take a product without doing my research, because it is always good to know what you're putting in your body. I looked at several sources including scholarly journals about many of the ingredients in Deer Antler IGF-1. It is a great product, and has been proven to work without ANY side effects. This product has definitely been helping with my lean muscle gains during my improvement season. It gives me energy before a workout, and it gives me some great vascularity while I'm lifting!
Deer Antler Velvet Pro has made an impact on the way elite athletes perform by providing them with the extra boost in strength and power they need to achieve their optimal performance. With 750mg of deer antler velvet powder in every serving, you can be sure that you’ll get an increase in your energy levels, lengthen your endurance abilities, and improve your sexual vitality. Read More…

While consumers wanted more information on the product. Let’s not forget the supplement industry is a multi-billionaire dollar business. And if Ray used the product then it must be legit, right? That’s what the immediate response in supplement sales would have you believe, as ESPN business reporter Darren Rovel reported that purchases skyrocketed within 24 hours of the report.
Find testimonials on antler velvet in general, or opinions on specific brands: Another great thing about our site, is that we have testimonials and opinions for deer antler velvet in general, as well as opinions on how specific brands compare against each other. Start by learning if deer antler velvet is right for you, then compare brand specific reviews to find the best product available for your needs and price range.
Assuming that deer antler velvet is the next biggest thing in muscle building and athletics isn’t just a massive leap of faith, it’s something that can’t be supported by science in any way, shape, or form. So why is it illegal? Because it’s still a synthetic, man-made growth hormone precursor. Those are illegal, according to most professional sports.
Assuming that deer antler velvet is the next biggest thing in muscle building and athletics isn’t just a massive leap of faith, it’s something that can’t be supported by science in any way, shape, or form. So why is it illegal? Because it’s still a synthetic, man-made growth hormone precursor. Those are illegal, according to most professional sports.
An ethanolic extract has been noted to, following oral ingestion of 100mg/kg, suppress nitric oxide secretion from peritoneal macrophages while stimulating phagocytic activity secondary to calcium mobilization,[19] and has been noted to increase macrophage cell count in a concentration dependent manner up to 171.5% at 150mcg/mL with a water extract (and 132.4% for splenocytes).[18] This immunostimulation appears to be related to phosphatidylcholine molecules with saturated fatty acid acyl chains[20] and is thought to underlie an anti-infective effect in mice infected with Staphylococcus aureus when Velvet Antler is ingested at 500mg/kg.[18]
As men and women get older, they naturally start producing less Human Growth Hormone (HGH). So levels of IGF-1 also decline with age. The liver produces IGF-1 when HGH is released.  HGH is converted to IGF-1. Aside from someone’s age, IGF-1 levels will vary depending on a person’s sex (men generally have more), level of activity, their diet, genetics and lifestyle.

In 1989, fitness expert John Abdo, who trained numerous Olympic and world class athletes, visited the Institute of Physical Culture in Moscow to investigate Russian training routines. At that time, Russian athletes underwent a dramatic increase in the success in weightlifting competitions. John met with former Soviet weight-lifting champion Victor Sheynkin and training expert Yuri Verhoshansky. John learned that their athletes had experienced considerable improvement in performance with deer antler velvet.  Dr Arkady Koltun, Chaiman of the Medical Committee for the Russian Bodybuilding Federation, and an expert on anabolic agents confirmed that deer antler velvet increases muscular strength and speeds recovery after exercise.


Reports claim deer antler helped Ray Lewis overcome his recent triceps tear, and Vijay Singh has admitted to using a spray supplement. University of Alabama football players also allegedly used deer antler sprays leading up to the 2013 BCS National Title Game. Whether or not those reports are true, one thing is certain: There’s not much proof that deer antler is a performance enhancer or a miraculous healer.
On January 30, 2013, Vijay Singh professional PGA Tour golfer was caught unaware and openly admitted to the personal use of deer antler spray which contained a banned substance at the time.[22] A week later the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) lifted the ban on deer antler spray, but with urgency, "Deer Antler Velvet Spray may contain IGF-1 and WADA recommends therefore that athletes be extremely vigilant with this supplement because it could lead to a positive test." [23] The consensus opinion of leading endocrinologists concerning any purported claims and benefits "is simply that there is far too little of the substance in even the purest forms of the spray to make any difference," [9] and "there is no medically valid way to deliver IGF-1 orally or in a spray." [24]
Chondroitin sulfate is a compound of connective tissues that are usually found in cartilage. Glucosamine sulfate is a natural building block for the growth and maintenance of healthy cartilage. Since osteoarthritis is caused by the deterioration of the cartilage in the bone joints, a daily supplement of deer antler velvet can help to stimulate the repair of deteriorated bone cartilage with healthy doses of chondroitin sulfate and glucosamine sulfate.
Well it’s been a little bit since I last talked to you Rick Lentini so I thought I would send you an email just to say hello, fill you in on how things are going out here, and see how everything is on your side of the world. Out here is all the same, its hot during the day, a little chilly at night and dusty all the time. Without breaching OPSEC I can tell you that our mission is going somewhat smooth and morale is at an all time high. We have a lot of moving parts and long days but at the end of every day the guys and myself are ready to attack the gym and get some well deserved rest just so we can wake up and do it all over again. Cpl Trousdale* and myself have made great progress in spreading the good word on IGF and have a lot of Marines, Soldiers, and Airmen, all coming back saying they are surprised with how effective IGF has been in not only their lifting but everyday work and play. OORAH to IGF! As for me, well I am just as pleased as everyone else, but more so that I’ve had the opportunity to communicate with you directly, it’s been a great pleasure. Semper Fidelis.

In Asia, velvet antler is dried and sold as slices, or as a powder which may be boiled in water, usually with other herbs and ingredients, and consumed as a medicinal soup.[6] In the traditional commercial trade of Korea and China, whole stick antler velvet is divided into three sections based upon their supposed properties. Although there is an absence of uniform standardization, these sections are known as the wax piece (uppers or tips), the blood piece (middles), and the bone piece (bottoms): the wax piece may be marketed as a growth tonic for children, the blood piece supposedly for joint and bone health, and the bone piece supposedly for calcium deficiency and geriatric needs.[2][5][9] Early commercial activity in Russia between the 1930s and 1980s led to the production of an alcohol extract from deer antler velvet marketed under the Russian drug trade name Pantocrin (also pantocrine or pantokrin).[10][11]
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