Deer antler Velvet Spray – the name is already quite intriguing. This may have caught the attention of those who’ve come across the spray. And when some of them saw that this covers joint care, then those who suffer from regular pains must have wanted to try it out. And like its name, the main component comes from powdered deer antlers. This may shock some consumers, but if you will visit the website, you’ll find that the manufacturers ensure that no animals are harmed.

One study published in the Journal of Ethnopharmacology found evidence that use of deer velvet antler may help strengthen joints and bones, reducing symptoms like joint pain associated with osteoarthritis. (10) After rats with osteoarthritic symptoms were given total velvet antler polypeptides from red deer (TVAPL) for 12 weeks, they showed signs of significant reversal in osteoporosis. The researchers found improvements in the rats’ bone weight coefficient (BWC), bone mineral density (BMD), and bone mineral content (BMC). They believe these effects were due to proliferation of cartilage and osteoblast-like cells, in addition to reductions in inflammation due to inhibition of interleukin-1 (IL-1).

Indeed, within weeks you may begin to notice less extra weight around the waist and a firmer belly  (a.k.a. a smaller "spare-tire").* We tell them, "That is because your hormones are working better and why you are looking and feeling better from all that hard work exercising." We get a spare-tire because our body gets tired, Your new thing to do with your nutrition and fitness program will remove that spare-tire and replace it with a lean and solid waist that you and others can be proud of.


Have you been searching for a supplement that can help you raise your workouts and physical performance to the next level? Maybe you've considered using Deer Antler Velvet before but aren't really sure what it is or which supplement is right for you? Look no further - our Deer Antler Spray is made with only the highest quality and nutrient-rich velvet directly from Red Deer in New Zealand.

A systemic review on human interventions[25] makes note of a study conducted on patients of osteoarthritis (Edelman et al. 2000; cannot be located online) which found improvements in joint pain symptoms relative to baseline in the Velvet Antler group and not placebo, although a lack of information on blinding and randomization precludes results that can be drawn from this study. 
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