And is easily understood as increasing the state of health, well-being and performance of body, mind and spirit. We see that its been known by many names. More recently in the Western world, a liquid form, sometimes known as deer antler spray, has become popular within North American for its specific cellular and glandular benefits. But what's all this buzz and hype?

A friend of mine gave me a bottle of your product about a month ago and I started taking it and, within a week, I started to feel energized at all hours of the day. In addition, as an actor I noticed an improvement in my memory. Most recently, I have seen a dramatic re-shaping of my body. I am gaining muscle mass and I have not trained or worked out in months! As a avid body builder most of my life, I noticed increased muscle mass without exercising, fat loss without dieting, higher energy levels, lower blood pressure, lower LDL cholesterol, younger and thicker skin, hair re-growth, wrinkles disappearing, sharper vision and bearing and of course increased memory retention…
The company has found that powders have only about a 15–20 percent absorption rate of IGF-1. This is due to how the digestive system breaks down the powder. Nutronics states that their “proprietary sublingual spray delivery system” is superior to many competitors because it offers “enhanced bioavailability” of IGF-1. They also point out that “it is not the milligrams of Deer Antler Velvet in the product, it’s the content of IGF-1 and other Growth Factors in Deer Antler Velvet, that makes the difference.”(6)
I have been using deer velvet to treat my arthritis for over 10 years. When I run out for a couple weeks, the pains increase and I lose mobility in my joints. And when I continue with the supplement, the pain goes away and the mobility comes back. Additionally it helps my over feeling of well being (I suspect it balances my hormones). I am a fan. I use 1000 mg of day of antler farms velvet from Ne ... Show Full Comment
The answer is that deer antler velvet is just another fat burner. Another cell volumizer. Another body-toning shoe. It’s fitness marketing at it’s finest—playing off a goal you desire (gaining more muscle and size) and drawing unsubstantiated and wildly exaggerated claims. There’s nothing miraculous about deer antler spray. And after a closer look at the product, there’s really—well—nothing to it at all.
In a study on diabetic mice given topical wounds (scalpel and scissors to create a cricle; diabetes tends to reduce wound healing rates[34] and thus diabetic rats are a good research model for wound closure rates) where either a control cream or one containing 400mcg Velvet Antler (Elk; water soluble extract) noted that there was less angiogenesis and a trend towards less inflammation assocaited with Velvet Antler cream while on day 7 wounds treated with the Antler cream were significantly smaller than control.[35] One 3.2kDa protein has been noted to possess wound healing properties, which are dose-dependent and have been noted to improve wound healing induced by burns at 0.05-0.1% of solution[36] and in vitro at 10-40mcg/mL.[37]
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In Asia, velvet antler is dried and sold as slices, or as a powder which may be boiled in water, usually with other herbs and ingredients, and consumed as a medicinal soup.[6] In the traditional commercial trade of Korea and China, whole stick antler velvet is divided into three sections based upon their supposed properties. Although there is an absence of uniform standardization, these sections are known as the wax piece (uppers or tips), the blood piece (middles), and the bone piece (bottoms): the wax piece may be marketed as a growth tonic for children, the blood piece supposedly for joint and bone health, and the bone piece supposedly for calcium deficiency and geriatric needs.[2][5][9] Early commercial activity in Russia between the 1930s and 1980s led to the production of an alcohol extract from deer antler velvet marketed under the Russian drug trade name Pantocrin (also pantocrine or pantokrin).[10][11]
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