Chondroitin sulfate is a compound of connective tissues that are usually found in cartilage. Glucosamine sulfate is a natural building block for the growth and maintenance of healthy cartilage. Since osteoarthritis is caused by the deterioration of the cartilage in the bone joints, a daily supplement of deer antler velvet can help to stimulate the repair of deteriorated bone cartilage with healthy doses of chondroitin sulfate and glucosamine sulfate.

On to the Deer Antler Spray and it’s positive effects this has had on my wife and I. Starting with me: In 2005 I had a titanium cage put into my L4-L5 lumbar region. My left leg was always numb and slept very little until a great neurosurgeon repaired it. Then 1 day I was on my 2 mile walk, and all of a sudden I felt this horrible left side pain. By that night my son, who was 16 at the time, said that my left side was all swelled up. It was hell all over again for me. I went to many doctors, stopped many in the halls of the University of Iowa Hospitals and asked if they could give me a tell. Of course none of them knew either. I was on hydrocodone for 4 years and also put on Lyrica. After hearing about Ray Lewis making this remarkable comeback from his tricep injury, which was really damaged and at his age should have retired, he came back for the playoffs. This blew me away because I also know much about sports injuries being I am an ex-athlete.
Find testimonials on antler velvet in general, or opinions on specific brands: Another great thing about our site, is that we have testimonials and opinions for deer antler velvet in general, as well as opinions on how specific brands compare against each other. Start by learning if deer antler velvet is right for you, then compare brand specific reviews to find the best product available for your needs and price range.
In 1989, fitness expert John Abdo, who trained numerous Olympic and world class athletes, visited the Institute of Physical Culture in Moscow to investigate Russian training routines. At that time, Russian athletes underwent a dramatic increase in the success in weightlifting competitions. John met with former Soviet weight-lifting champion Victor Sheynkin and training expert Yuri Verhoshansky. John learned that their athletes had experienced considerable improvement in performance with deer antler velvet.  Dr Arkady Koltun, Chaiman of the Medical Committee for the Russian Bodybuilding Federation, and an expert on anabolic agents confirmed that deer antler velvet increases muscular strength and speeds recovery after exercise.
Research has been conducted on the potential use of deer antler velvet for healing of wounds. In Russia (Arapov, 1969), Pantocrin was administered to patients with surgical and internal wounds. The study reported that there were a number of positive effects, including the normalization of arterial pressure, reduction in surgical complications, and becoming active quicker. In tests on rats (Wang, 1985), bone fracture repair was accelerated. A recent study by Bubenik found that antler helped heal epidermal wounds in rats. In another study by Takikawa, et al., researchers reported observing new bone formation following experimental whiplash injuries in rabbits. Pretreatment in rats reduced cell degradation and improved recovery times from extreme temperature and electric shock exposure. 
In Asia, velvet antler is dried and sold as slices, or as a powder which may be boiled in water, usually with other herbs and ingredients, and consumed as a medicinal soup.[6] In the traditional commercial trade of Korea and China, whole stick antler velvet is divided into three sections based upon their supposed properties. Although there is an absence of uniform standardization, these sections are known as the wax piece (uppers or tips), the blood piece (middles), and the bone piece (bottoms): the wax piece may be marketed as a growth tonic for children, the blood piece supposedly for joint and bone health, and the bone piece supposedly for calcium deficiency and geriatric needs.[2][5][9] Early commercial activity in Russia between the 1930s and 1980s led to the production of an alcohol extract from deer antler velvet marketed under the Russian drug trade name Pantocrin (also pantocrine or pantokrin).[10][11]
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