I was first introduced to and started using IGF-1 Plus™ in July of 1999. I made it part of my daily regiment originally to increase my stamina and build my muscles while burning body fat at the same time (which I was informed this would help me accomplish). I am 35 years old and exercise for about an hour or so at a time, 3 to 4 times a week. It is now the end of February 2000 and I’m extremely impressed at the results! People have commented on my appearance and I have been reaching new heights in the gym that I though were only obtainable by using drugs like steroids (which I never considered taking due to the unwanted side effects). However IGF-1 has not only increased my strength and endurance, but has given me much more in ways that I had not anticipated! For instance, the person who shared this with me had no idea that I have arthritis. I would wake up in the morning and my joints would ache severely (especially my wrists and elbows) until eleven o’clock or noon. Now, although it took me a few weeks to start really noticing my improvements in the gym, it didn’t take but 3 -4 days for me to take notice of the fact that my morning arthritis pains were completely gone. The only time the pain has come back is when I ran out of the spray and couldn’t get a hold of any for a couple of weeks because I was out of town vacationing in Florida. Now I try to have at least a couple extra bottles on hand! Also, my hair stylist of 17 years had noticed that I had lost a significant amount of gray on my head and asked if I was coloring my hair. I’ll make sure I never run out of this amazing formula again!!!

On January 30, 2013, Vijay Singh professional PGA Tour golfer was caught unaware and openly admitted to the personal use of deer antler spray which contained a banned substance at the time.[22] A week later the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) lifted the ban on deer antler spray, but with urgency, "Deer Antler Velvet Spray may contain IGF-1 and WADA recommends therefore that athletes be extremely vigilant with this supplement because it could lead to a positive test." [23] The consensus opinion of leading endocrinologists concerning any purported claims and benefits "is simply that there is far too little of the substance in even the purest forms of the spray to make any difference," [9] and "there is no medically valid way to deliver IGF-1 orally or in a spray." [24]

As this supplement is derived from 'deer', the two most commonly used species of deer in mainland China include the Sika deer Cervus nippon Temminck and Red Deer Cervus elaphus Linnaeus; these species may be relevant.[1] 'Farming' of deers for antlers includes raising deer and sawing off the antlers under analgesia,[2][3] the annual yeild appears to be 120-150 tonnes and deer are not usually killed as antlers are capable of full regeneration.[3]
Even more intriguing is how the stags manage to regrow their antlers. Scientists have found stem cells at the bases of antlers’essentially ‘blank’ cells that can develop into many different types of cell, such as a skin cell or a cartilage cell. If they could find out what triggers the stem cells and controls their development into antlers, the knowledge could be applied to the regeneration of human limbs and organs. Scientists know that the shedding is initiated by a fall in the hormone testosterone, a change linked to an increase in day length, and they think oestrogen may be a key cellular regulator. However, much more research on a molecular level is required to unravel what is clearly an intricate process.
Deer antler velvet's effects on cell growth and repair have been investigated in several areas. Deer antler velvet may be a natural source of hormones for those seeking aid to muscle growth and development. Research has identified various growth factors in deer antler velvet including IGF-1 (insulin–like Growth Factor-1), IGF-2 (insulin–like Growth Factor-2), and EGF (Epidermal Growth Factor).

In Asia, velvet antler is dried and sold as slices, or as a powder which may be boiled in water, usually with other herbs and ingredients, and consumed as a medicinal soup.[6] In the traditional commercial trade of Korea and China, whole stick antler velvet is divided into three sections based upon their supposed properties. Although there is an absence of uniform standardization, these sections are known as the wax piece (uppers or tips), the blood piece (middles), and the bone piece (bottoms): the wax piece may be marketed as a growth tonic for children, the blood piece supposedly for joint and bone health, and the bone piece supposedly for calcium deficiency and geriatric needs.[2][5][9] Early commercial activity in Russia between the 1930s and 1980s led to the production of an alcohol extract from deer antler velvet marketed under the Russian drug trade name Pantocrin (also pantocrine or pantokrin).[10][11]
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