Insulin-like Growth Factor 1 (IGF-1) is an anabolic molecule which appears to induce growth of the antlers themselves,[31][32] although testosterone may be the primary growth factor.[33] Currently, there is no evidence that serum IGF-1 is increased following Velvet Antler ingestion with one study using 1.5g of Velvet Antler for 11 weeks failing to increase serum IGF-1.[26]

Many people from many cultures use it. Throughout history it has been used by the American Indians, Europeans, Romans, Russians, and Asians as an alcohol extract. Often it was easily made into soups for its strengthening bone broth protein full of raw material for tissues, joints and bone. The most complete ancient literature is the Chinese texts, which give it top classification for over 2,000 years.
First, the following disclaimer: Products that are sold as supplements (as opposed to medications) are not regulated by the Food and Drug Administration so they are not tested for safety, efficacy or standardization.  In other words, when you buy a supplement, there is no guarantee that what is in the bottle has been tested to see if it even contains the ingredient in question, let alone whether the ingredient actually does what it claims to.  (That’s not a value judgment, just the facts.)
Yes, the Soviets had even been involved in extensive research to ascertain the performance benefits of deer antler velvet. But they've been using it for awhile. In their country it was known in Russian folk use to be a warming and vitalizing food several hundred years ago, but with the advent of modern history, they began research nearly 90 years ago.

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Shake bottle before each use. Then take 12 drops under the tongue twice a day. Hold the liquid under your tongue for 20 seconds before swallowing. This allows the formula to penetrate through your endocrine glands. Then the active molecules are released directly into your bloodstream. This is how Nutronics Labs' liposome technology is able to deliver an enhanced bioavailability!
According to modern research, deer antler velvet has shown gonadotropic activity. Studies by both Fisher and Wang indicate that deer antler velvet may increase testosterone levels in men and can help prevent some conditions associated with aging. The estrogen hormone most affected by deer antler velvet is estradiol. Estradiol is a precursor to testosterone.
Other uses include treatment of high cholesterol, high blood pressure, migraines, muscle aches and pains, asthma, indigestion, weak bones (osteoporosis), headache, liver and kidney disorders, cold hands and feet, soreness and weakness in the lower back and knees, chronic skin ulcers, and overactive bladder. It is also used to promote youthfulness, sharpen thinking skills, protect the liver from toxins, stimulate production and circulation of blood, and increase the number of red blood cells.
As men and women get older, they naturally start producing less Human Growth Hormone (HGH). So levels of IGF-1 also decline with age. The liver produces IGF-1 when HGH is released.  HGH is converted to IGF-1. Aside from someone’s age, IGF-1 levels will vary depending on a person’s sex (men generally have more), level of activity, their diet, genetics and lifestyle.
Both a lack of sexual desire and sexual performance issues like erectile dysfunction can be traced back to a low testosterone level. Deer antler velvet can help increase the production of hormones related to sexual functions, including testosterone and its metabolites. In this way, deer antler velvet can help as not only an aphrodisiac but also as a possible treatment for erectile dysfunction.
In Asia, velvet antler is dried and sold as slices, or as a powder which may be boiled in water, usually with other herbs and ingredients, and consumed as a medicinal soup.[6] In the traditional commercial trade of Korea and China, whole stick antler velvet is divided into three sections based upon their supposed properties. Although there is an absence of uniform standardization, these sections are known as the wax piece (uppers or tips), the blood piece (middles), and the bone piece (bottoms): the wax piece may be marketed as a growth tonic for children, the blood piece supposedly for joint and bone health, and the bone piece supposedly for calcium deficiency and geriatric needs.[2][5][9] Early commercial activity in Russia between the 1930s and 1980s led to the production of an alcohol extract from deer antler velvet marketed under the Russian drug trade name Pantocrin (also pantocrine or pantokrin).[10][11]
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