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I’ve been using it for about 4 months now with my diet and I’ve lost 80 lbs and gained a little muscle from it I can tell you my performance at work and in the gage lifting is awesome I feel like an animal I can go wok out for and 1 1/2 hrs and come in the house and sit down and squirting about 15 sprays of deer velvet extract under my tounge and in 30 minutes I’m ready to lift again it makes me recover really quick I’ve it!!!
The IGF-1 found in deer antler spray is derived from deer antler velvet, the tissue found inside the deer's antlers before they fully harden. Since deer antlers grow incredibly fast, it is not surprising that the horns are rich in IGF-1. This is a naturally-occurring form of IGF-1, meaning it is not made in a lab. As a result, deer antler velvet is considered a dietary supplement by the Food and Drug Administration, and unlike synthesized drugs, the product does have to be proven safe or effective before it's sold to the public.
Velvet antler has been used in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) that classifies many similar substances from a variety of species under the simplified Chinese name 鹿茸; (pinyin Lu Rong) and the commercial name Cervi Cornu Pantorichum.[citation needed] The two common species used within the TCM system are sika deer and red deer which are thought to be useful for treating yang deficiency syndromes.[6][7][8]
A systemic review on human interventions[25] makes note of a study conducted on patients of osteoarthritis (Edelman et al. 2000; cannot be located online) which found improvements in joint pain symptoms relative to baseline in the Velvet Antler group and not placebo, although a lack of information on blinding and randomization precludes results that can be drawn from this study.
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