If you suffer from ailments or if you’re hesitant about drugs without the FDA stamp of approval, then listen to the doctors and stay away from Deer Antler Velvet Spray. On the other hand, if you’re a believer of alternative medicine and you’re looking for a natural joint care supplement, then you can choose to listen too many of the customers and try this out.
However, calcium and phosphorus levels (which are important for bone growth) did not differ among groups. Overall, the researchers concluded that “our results seem to support a role for dietary supplementation of EVA on growth and bone development in this model.” (9) However, it’s important to point out that this is a very high dose. It’s significantly above what most would take in supplement form.
"This mountain bike loop that I do almost everyday usually takes 48-50 minutes. After a few weeks of Antler Farms®, I saw that number continually go down. I am at basically an average of 4 minutes shaven off every time that I do that loop. Faster recovery also. I have more energy later on in the afternoon. Just all around really good results. Good stuff. Highly recommend it."*

Published research has shown that IGF-1 can produce similar results to growth hormone. The catch? If you do the math from the study, a 150-pound man (that’s a pretty small guy, so a bigger man would need more) would have to take more than 25 million nanograms just to experience the growth hormone-like effects of more muscle, less fat, and faster recovery.

The appropriate dose of deer velvet depends on several factors such as the user's age, health, and several other conditions. At this time there is not enough scientific information to determine an appropriate range of doses for deer velvet. Keep in mind that natural products are not always necessarily safe and dosages can be important. Be sure to follow relevant directions on product labels and consult your pharmacist or physician or other healthcare professional before using.

A systemic review on human interventions[25] makes note of a study conducted on patients of osteoarthritis (Edelman et al. 2000; cannot be located online) which found improvements in joint pain symptoms relative to baseline in the Velvet Antler group and not placebo, although a lack of information on blinding and randomization precludes results that can be drawn from this study.
×