Most of the world's supply of velvet antler comes from Sika deer, red deer and elk or wapiti, including a large deer ranching industry in New Zealand. New Zealand is the world’s largest producer of velvet, producing 450-500 tons of red deer velvet antler annually.[1] China produces 400 tons of predominantly Sika deer velvet antler annually. Russia produces 80 tons annually. United States and Canada each produce 20 tons annually.[2]
“My name is Sidney Outlaw and I’m a professional Mixed Martial Arts Fighter. For some time during and after my workouts, I had been struggling with training alongside some of the world’s best UFC fighters. Then I started using a Nutronics Labs supplement. Since I’ve been using this product, I have more energy during my workouts and my post workout recovery has improved tremendously. I’m able to train with my MMA team and also my memory has improved which helps with my ability to focus.
The product smells like lemon-scented cleaner and bears a resemblance to murky pond water. I hesitantly tried the stuff and found it surprisingly palatable, with a lemon taste, but not too sour and slightly sweet. The directions say to take 14 drops under the tongue, three times a day, but I stopped after one dose — so I probably don't have a good chance of reaping the benefits, if there are any.
The appropriate dose of deer velvet depends on several factors such as the user's age, health, and several other conditions. At this time there is not enough scientific information to determine an appropriate range of doses for deer velvet. Keep in mind that natural products are not always necessarily safe and dosages can be important. Be sure to follow relevant directions on product labels and consult your pharmacist or physician or other healthcare professional before using.
Reports claim deer antler helped Ray Lewis overcome his recent triceps tear, and Vijay Singh has admitted to using a spray supplement. University of Alabama football players also allegedly used deer antler sprays leading up to the 2013 BCS National Title Game. Whether or not those reports are true, one thing is certain: There’s not much proof that deer antler is a performance enhancer or a miraculous healer.
The harvesting of deer antler velvet can be a painful process, as the velvet tissue contains an abundance of nerves and bleeds profusely if cut or removed. Dr. Low Dog says she has no problem with harvesting velvet from deer killed for food, but is concerned that shortcuts will be taken should demand for the supplements continue to grow. She notes that the United Kingdom has banned the removal of deer antler velvet under its welfare-of-livestock regulations, unless the antlers have been damaged or most of the velvet has been shed.

Keeping true to our original Deer Antler Spray formula, Deer Antler Velvet Extract HERS is all-natural and contains the same amount of Deer Antler Velvet as the original, coming to us straight from red deer in New Zealand. Like the original, our new product is high in the growth hormone IGF-1. This new spray, however, is testosterone free and contains: collagen type II, biotin, green tea, and epimedium, all of which have benefits specially geared toward female athletes. Epimedium, known in Chinese medicine as “yin yang huo”, has the same effect as estrogen, can increase libido, and produce osteoblasts, the cells that secretes the matrix for bone formation. This promotes strong bones, and aids in the prevention of osteoporosis. Collagen, is a protein that forms the strong, flexible white fibers of the body's bone, cartilage, and connective tissue, and is vital for tissue regeneration. Biotin can speed up metabolism, improve glucose levels, and improve brittle nails. Green tea, is one of nature's most powerful antioxidants, and has been linked to cancer prevention, Alzheimer's prevention, the prevention of obesity, and countless other health benefits.
Aloe Vera Juice: Taken from the pulp of aloe plants and thought by some cultures to have medicinal properties. Aloe is used to treat some skin conditions like sunburn and acne, as well as hemorrhoids, osteoarthritis, and ocular issues. Aloe is safe for topical use or in small doses, however it is not recommended for long-term ingestion or in large quantities. Side effects can include:

Elk velvet antlers have been shown to contain chondroitin sulfate. This has a growth-promoting effect on cells throughout the body, which helps with recovery. This includes cells in the gut. It is believed that cartilage proteoglycans regulate water retention and differentiation and proliferation of chondrocytes inside cartilage tissue. Four types of collagen (I, II, III, and X) have also been identified in deer antlers. The collagen may provide benefits including rebuilding damaged parts of the GI tract, skin and joints. This might be beneficial for preventing or helping to treat leaky gut syndrome, which contributes to widespread symptoms.


Deer antler velvet can play a pivotal role in helping to not only relieve the symptoms of diseases that affect joints, such as osteoarthritis, they can possibly eliminate them entirely. The way it may do this is through the introduction of chondroitin sulfate and glucosamine sulfate into the body. Both of these compounds are abundant in deer antler velvet.
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