Reports claim deer antler helped Ray Lewis overcome his recent triceps tear, and Vijay Singh has admitted to using a spray supplement. University of Alabama football players also allegedly used deer antler sprays leading up to the 2013 BCS National Title Game. Whether or not those reports are true, one thing is certain: There’s not much proof that deer antler is a performance enhancer or a miraculous healer.
While consumers wanted more information on the product. Let’s not forget the supplement industry is a multi-billionaire dollar business. And if Ray used the product then it must be legit, right? That’s what the immediate response in supplement sales would have you believe, as ESPN business reporter Darren Rovel reported that purchases skyrocketed within 24 hours of the report.
Other studies reported an increase in heart strength and volume of blood pumped, while cardiac output, heart rate, mean arterial pressure, pulse pressure, central venous pressure and other parameters remained unchanged. Researchers suggest that the polysaccharides in antler may reduce the blood’s tendency to clot, improving circulation, decreasing stroke risk and boosting general cardiovascular health. Researchers theorize that the deer antler velvet may improve blood supply to muscles or act as an anti-inflammatory, allowing athletes to recover faster from training sessions.

Increase your overall energy and motivation while getting the most of your rest and recovery. Adapting to stress assist will help us better regulate our immune, nervous and adrenal systems. Adapting to stress means hormonal health. Proper use could even benefit an overactive system that is depleted, therefore promoting greater health in those with adrenal fatigue. It does so by activating the glands which secrete hormones that boost recovery and regeneration.

As men and women get older, they naturally start producing less Human Growth Hormone (HGH). So levels of IGF-1 also decline with age. The liver produces IGF-1 when HGH is released.  HGH is converted to IGF-1. Aside from someone’s age, IGF-1 levels will vary depending on a person’s sex (men generally have more), level of activity, their diet, genetics and lifestyle.
In a randomized, placebo controlled test in 2004, researchers at the University of Alberta, Canada, placed 18 males from the Edmonton Police Force into a 9 week strength training program. The results showed that deer antler velvet increased the strength and endurance of the subjects relative to the control group. The researchers found that use of deer antler velvet significantly increased blood plasma testosterone levels. 
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