Deer antlers have been closely linked to IGF-1, which is another term for insulin. This has been well received in eastern medicine as an anti-aging and bodybuilding product. Because it’s also a known natural growth hormone, it’s said to aid in muscle development by enhancing strength and improving recovery time. This is what attracts bodybuilders to this product.
Since I’ve been taking your IGF-1 product, I’ve been able to shadow box up to 30 minutes a day. Your product has helped me tremendously even at my age. I haven’t felt this good in years. My energy, stamina and mobility are back. I wish I had this product back in the day. I would recommend the IGF-1 100,000 Maximum to anyone, whether they are an athlete or not. IGF-1 is unbelievable! It is a real championship product. Hope to see you soon.
Velvet Antler is a supplement derived from powdered or crushed antlers, most commonly from deer (and thus referred to as Deer Velvet Antler) although Elk have also been used. They have been used in Traditional Chinese Medicine.[1] The base of the antler is referred to as Cervus (in reference to deers), Lu Jiao Pan, Zhen Zhu Pan, as well as Lu Hua Pan and appears to have been traditionally used for cardiovascular disease, gynecological problems, immunological deficiencies, blood cancers, tissue repair and health promotion.[1] The specific part used is the antler base; when the antler is sawed off the base temporarily remains until the regeneration of the new antler pushes it off which occurrs occasionally in the wild. Traditional usage involves using the base and macerating it in wine or decocting it with water for oral consumption.[1]
World harvest extends far and wide. The farming of deer species for their velvet antler has been occurring for a long time in China and Russia. The Asian industry raises a predominant amount of sika, aka. spotted deer, on private and communal farms where they are well cared for by private owners. Quality of a this profound botanical is of utmost importance. Farms in Asia it is also both industry and government regulated for quality, safety, and the welfare of the animals.
I know of no scientific evidence to support any of the marketing claims made for these supplements. I discussed your question with Tieraona Low Dog, M.D., an internationally recognized expert in the fields of integrative medicine, dietary supplements and women’s health, and an authority on botanical medicine. She explains that IGF-1 in the velvet promotes rapid growth of the antler. Dr. Low Dog notes that the two studies examining the effects of deer antler velvet supplements taken by athletes have yielded conflicting results. One showed some improvements in endurance and knee strength in weightlifters, but the other found no differences in rowers after 10 weeks of supplementation.
Deer antler Velvet Spray – the name is already quite intriguing. This may have caught the attention of those who’ve come across the spray. And when some of them saw that this covers joint care, then those who suffer from regular pains must have wanted to try it out. And like its name, the main component comes from powdered deer antlers. This may shock some consumers, but if you will visit the website, you’ll find that the manufacturers ensure that no animals are harmed.
Deer antlers have been closely linked to IGF-1, which is another term for insulin. This has been well received in eastern medicine as an anti-aging and bodybuilding product. Because it’s also a known natural growth hormone, it’s said to aid in muscle development by enhancing strength and improving recovery time. This is what attracts bodybuilders to this product.
When antlers fall off, they leave wounds that heal quickly, without forming a scar. Researchers have found that velvet antler contains substances that encourage healing, and could be of use to humans. Of particular interest are 3 hormones known to promote growth of skin tissue: insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1), epidermal growth factor (EGF) and transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1). In a recent study, an ointment made from velvet antler, containing these compounds, enhanced healing when applied to the skin of rats. IGF-1 was a hot topic in the media in the winter of 2013 when a football player, Ray Lewis, was accused of using a banned spray containing IGF-1.

In an ovalbumin sensitized mouse model, 4 weeks of Velvet Antler at 2.5-10mg total (weight of mice not given, assuming 20g this equals 125-500mg/kg or 10-40mg/kg for humans) was able to reduce total Immunoglobulin E (IgE) and Ovalbumin-specific IgE at 14, 21, and 28 days.[21] When challenged with methacholine and subsequently having their airway power measured, it appeared that Velvet Antler exert anti-asthmatic effects in regards to allergies.[21] 
Deer Antler Velvet Spray has been tested and results show that this is safe. It doesn’t contain the controversial Human Growth Hormone, but it offers the same benefits. This doesn’t need a prescription. However, the site states that some have experienced mild stomach pains. While this is considered a supplement, doctors still advise you to go in for consultation because this product is surrounded with controversy and isn’t well accepted by the medical community.
First, the facts: Deer antler has been a popular element of Eastern medicine for centuries. And—like red meat, eggs, or milk—deer antler contains small amounts of insulin-like growth factor 1, or IGF-1, explains Oliver Catlin, president of the Banned Substances Control Group (BSCG), which tests dietary supplements for illegal performance enhancers.
There is an increasing amount of scientific evidence supporting the benefits of deer antler velvet from decades of research carried out in Russia, Korea, China, Japan, Australia and New Zealand. This research has given credibility to deer antler velvet’s traditional usage and validated recommendations for its inclusion as an everyday health supplement. Almost 250 papers have been published since 1930 on the manufacture, composition and biochemical effect of deer antler velvet. Studies on deer antler velvet and the corresponding findings are described below.
In 168 persons with stable Rheumatoid Arthritis but present pain (25-100mm on the VAS rating scale) given either 1g of Velvet Antler from Elk or placebo for 6 months noted that there were no significant differences between placebo and Velvet Antler in regards to pain.[23] Another study by the same research group using a smaller sample (n=40) and graded doses of 430mg, 860mg, and 1290mg daily noted that there was a dose-dependent trend towards reduced pain symptoms but this was not statistically significant.[24]
Research has been conducted on the potential use of deer antler velvet for healing of wounds. In Russia (Arapov, 1969), Pantocrin was administered to patients with surgical and internal wounds. The study reported that there were a number of positive effects, including the normalization of arterial pressure, reduction in surgical complications, and becoming active quicker. In tests on rats (Wang, 1985), bone fracture repair was accelerated. A recent study by Bubenik found that antler helped heal epidermal wounds in rats. In another study by Takikawa, et al., researchers reported observing new bone formation following experimental whiplash injuries in rabbits. Pretreatment in rats reduced cell degradation and improved recovery times from extreme temperature and electric shock exposure. 
In the days leading up to Super Bowl XLVII we’ve heard a lot about deer antler velvet and the question of whether or not Baltimore Ravens’ linebacker Ray Lewis used an extract of it (in spray form) to help heal the triceps muscle he tore in October 2012. This could be a problem for Lewis, since deer antler velvet contains a substance that is banned by the National Football League (NFL).
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These are required in enzyme and catalytic cellular functions as well as being the raw material for tissues. Growth factors are known to boost cellular functioning and uptake of nutrients This helps our own growth, regeneration of tissues and injury recovery, as well as a slowing and preventing the effects of agings. Many hormones are closely associated with IGF-1
Three things I can’t stand: 1. Drama 2. Lying and BS. This story is real and if they let me send pictures showing my side and me now doing pull ups and side intercostal work, which there was no way I could do this before the mail person came, I will darn sure show people that this is REAL! It works! My wife uses the same dose and the Starter I should say actually. Anyways, she was quite chunky but not fat, by American standards. One day she came up to me and showed me her thigh area up towards her private area. It as like her fat was literally melting away and it looked like a skin spider web, if you can even try to imagine that. She lost weight, about 15 lbs. in 8 weeks. We do exercise with a Bowflex and walk 2 miles every other day when the kids do not have loads of confusing homework. We just joined the 90 day Auto Ship Program, so she and I could both have our own bottle for a change. Plus the price is unbeatable. As far as customer service goes here, they take weekends off (get over it, they need time off too), and they ship fast and we are very happy at least.

More recent tests (Slievert, 2003) confirm deer antler velvet’s effects on muscle strength and endurance. In a randomized, double blind, placebo controlled experiment, 18 males entered a 10 week strength training program. Those who took deer antler velvet showed an increase in maximal aerobic capacity, an increase in strength in the bench press and leg squat, and decrease in body fat relative to the placebo group.
Endurance athletes have shown increases in red blood cell count and greater aerobic capacities, but this benefit takes time to ripen. More energy for you. But we need a certain amount to get real results, more on dosage below. Many receive metabolic benefits that increase overall energy and well-being. A specific group of those who supplement with our extract prefer it as a natural alternative.
I am a cancer survivor from 1993. I started using IGF-1 in October 2001. The Cancer I had in ’93 had a 0 survivor rate, but through God, nutrition and supplements I healed. Still, I was left with intense pain, chronic fatigue, and other damage done by the cancer. IGF-1 is now one supplement I will not do without, no way, period. IGF-1 has virtually helped me rebuild my body from the vast cancer induced damage. I am now not only pain free, I am also surfing at 46 years young with the teenagers and physically cannot be held back. I have increased lean muscle mass, the silver in my hair has disappeared and my vision has returned to full focus. I more than highly recommend IGF-1 to everyone wishing to be youthful in body and mind. Thank you and congratulations on the most important find in our century.
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Deer antler velvet is supposed to help you build muscle. It allegedly elevates levels of IGF-1, an important hormone that helps you pack on mass. As “side effects” you also should see improvements in strength and endurance. And some products even claim it speeds recovery, which is why it was linked to Ray Lewis who earlier suffered an apparent season-ending injury, and yet has played and performed at a high level in the playoffs.
In September, 2013, the headquarters of S.W.A.T.S. was raided and ordered to be shut down by Alabama's attorney general citing "numerous serious and willful violations of Alabama’s deceptive trade practices act".[30][31] Among the violations were "claims that the company made about a number of products that were unsupported by scientific research. Some of these products were marketed as 'dietary supplements.'" [32] The assistant Alabama attorney general "says that Deer Antler Spray is dangerous and its sellers are law-breakers." [33]

Velvet antler in the form of deer antler spray has been at the center of multiple controversies with professional sports leagues and famous athletes allegedly using it for injury recovery and performance enhancement purposes.[18] In mid-2011 a National Football League (NFL) player successfully sued a deer antler velvet spray manufacturer for testing positive for methyltestosterone in 2009 for a total amount of 5.4 million US dollars.[19][20] In August 2011, Major League Baseball (MLB) added deer antler spray to their list of prohibited items because it contains "potentially contaminated nutritional supplements." [21]
Deer antler velvet's effects on cell growth and repair have been investigated in several areas. Deer antler velvet may be a natural source of hormones for those seeking aid to muscle growth and development. Research has identified various growth factors in deer antler velvet including IGF-1 (insulin–like Growth Factor-1), IGF-2 (insulin–like Growth Factor-2), and EGF (Epidermal Growth Factor). 
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