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Ultimately it is too early in the testing process for our experts to be able to recommend Deer Antler Velvet Spray as either safe or effective as a joint health supplement. It is more possible it is effective as a male libido enhancer than as a nutritional supplement, and there is little reason to think that Deer Antler Velvet Spray could do much to actually contribute to the health of the body’s connective tissues. It does not have any anti-inflammatory agents to fight joint pain, there is only the smallest amount of glucosamine and chondroitin, and finally the potential for negative consequences is too high for our team to be able to encourage our readers to consume this product.


In an ovalbumin sensitized mouse model, 4 weeks of Velvet Antler at 2.5-10mg total (weight of mice not given, assuming 20g this equals 125-500mg/kg or 10-40mg/kg for humans) was able to reduce total Immunoglobulin E (IgE) and Ovalbumin-specific IgE at 14, 21, and 28 days.[21] When challenged with methacholine and subsequently having their airway power measured, it appeared that Velvet Antler exert anti-asthmatic effects in regards to allergies.[21] 

In Russia, Korea and China, deer antler velvet is widely used by athletes to enhance performance. In the United States, more and more athletes are looking to deer antler velvet as a training aid, a promoter of recovery after physical activity and injury, and possibly an injury preventative. Deer velvet could improve athletic performance in many ways, for example by assisting strength and endurance, by supporting the oxygen-carrying capacity of the blood, by facilitating minor tissue damage, and by boosting the immune system.
In a randomized, placebo controlled test in 2004, researchers at the University of Alberta, Canada, placed 18 males from the Edmonton Police Force into a 9 week strength training program. The results showed that deer antler velvet increased the strength and endurance of the subjects relative to the control group. The researchers found that use of deer antler velvet significantly increased blood plasma testosterone levels.  
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